Water and Wastewater Solutions For The Oil and Gas Industry

  1. Predicting The Worldwide Impact Of Water Scarcity On The Energy Sector
    9/26/2014

    As water is stretched and regulations around it tightened, the energy industry feels the burden. This can result in everything from reduced operations and higher costs for consumers to,in extreme cases, blackouts and gas and electricity shortages.

  2. Hydraulic Fracturing And The EPA Water Study: Where Do We Go From Here?
    8/3/2015

    It’s been two months since EPA released its much anticipated draft report on hydraulic fracturing, and organizations like ours are busy preparing their official comments, which are due at the end of August. But based on what we have learned so far and what has been written in the media, it’s important to spend some time on what the report said — and didn’t say — and what it all means.

  3. Profit Potential Of Industrial Wastewater In The Circular Economy
    12/11/2017

    In the midst of a global water crisis, industries today too often overlook a river of revenue opportunity: their own wastewater.

  4. Scientists Identify Opportunities To Better Understand Oilfield Wastewater
    4/24/2019

    Collaborative research is a critical element for identifying unforeseen risks associated with using the oil industry’s wastewater outside the oilfield. That’s the recommendation of a new peer-reviewed paper accepted this week in the Journal of Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management (IEAM).

  5. New Tech Offers Low-Energy Oil And Gas Wastewater Management
    12/14/2015

    Microbial capacitive deionization (MCD) shows promise as a sustainable, low-cost treatment solution for produced water.

  6. Onshore Crude Oil Decontamination Using A Water Security Test Bed
    11/6/2018

    Onshore crude oil production has increased in the United States over the past few years. Oil producers, specifically the North Dakota Pipeline Authority and the Bakken Shale field producers are transporting crude oil by rail and train to both the East and West Coast oil refineries. While rail tends to be one of the safer and more efficient ways of transporting crude oil, there is still a risk of a spill. Oil spills are threats to both ground and surface waters, which can ultimately impact drinking water.

  7. Global Crisis And Modern Solutions At The Water-Energy Nexus
    2/18/2016

    GE Water & Process Technologies and the World Resources Institute (WRI), an independent research organization studying sustainability, jointly produced a white paper called “Water-Energy Nexus: Business Risks and Rewards.” The paper hones in on the shared interest of the two groups, namely the supply of freshwater counted on by the energy industry, which in turn fuels water treatment operations, a relationship that’s known as the “water-energy nexus.”

  8. Refinery Expands Production While Meeting Discharge Standards Quality
    8/5/2016

    Petron Bataan Refinery wanted to expand production to process 180 thousand barrels of crude oil per day while changing its feedstock from Arab Light to less costly heavy and sour crudes.

  9. How Oil & Gas States Did (And Did Not) Protect Land And Water In 2018
    1/11/2019

    Keeping an eye on what happens with domestic oil and gas regulation is a bit like herding cats. We’ve seen encouraging progress on air quality issues related to oil and gas, but an equally critical front that’s seen major action is protection of our land and water resources.

  10. From The 1970s To Today – 4 Key Advances In Coriolis Flow Measurement
    11/8/2017

    Since the first Coriolis flow sensors were introduced to the marketplace in the 1970s, the technology has evolved considerably. As the installed base for Coriolis grew, the sensors were being called upon to deliver data in environments with increasing levels of complexity. This meant that Coriolis sensors had to adapt and conform to a dizzying array of ever-changing installation requirements, process conditions, communication formats, and configuration parameters. The following article highlights four key advances in Coriolis flow measurement’s journey from the 1970s to today.