Wastewater Treatment Application Notes

  1. Microbial Control In Cheese Making

    Microbial contamination of food and beverage products is a potentially catastrophic occurrence resulting in foodborne illness or food spoilage. The same nutritive properties that render cheese and dairy products such a valuable food also provide an ideal growth medium for microbes if contamination occurs.

  2. Process Monitoring And Control For Increased Productivity And Efficiency

    The Littleton/Englewood wastewater treatment plant, Colorado, put in place processes to effectively monitor the levels of ammonia in their wastewater treatment.

  3. Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen: Simplified With s-TKN™

    The Dallas County Water and Sewer Authority (DCWSA) in Selma, Alabama recently found itself in a tough spot: under the scrutiny of the Alabama Department of Environmental Management (ADEM). The wastewater treatment system needed better means for control. Ammonia, TSS, cBOD, and TKN readings were out of compliance. Then they discovered a new testing method known as simplified-TKN (s-TKN), and with it, better process control to achieve regulatory compliance. By Andrew Antonio, Municipal Wastewater Market Manager and Derek Walker, Applications Development Manager

  4. Ultrasonic Level Measurement In Water And Wastewater Plants

    Radar technology is often viewed as the “best” method of level measurement, but this isn’t necessarily true in the water industry.

  5. 3M™ Liqui-Cel™ Membrane Contactors Are Widely Used In The Soft Drink And Brewing Industries To Control Dissolved Gasses

    Gas control is an important concern in the beverage industry. Oxygen in the water can oxidize flavor components and shorten the shelf life of the product. Carbon dioxide can also have an impact on taste and pH of the product.

  6. On-Line Phosphorous Measurement Takes The Guesswork Out Of Alum Treatment

    Phosphorous promotes eutrophication in surface waters and helps create conditions for algal blooming and oxygen depletion. Some phosphorous removal can occur naturally in a conventional biological wastewater treatment facility, but the result is not reliably compliant with increasingly strict limits on permissible phosphate levels in effluent discharged to receiving streams, ponds and lakes. By Bob Dabkowski, Hach Company

  7. Dissolved Oxygen Measurement In A Wastewater Treatment Plant

    Breakdown of organic wastes entering a wastewater treatment plant is accomplished by using a biomass or blend of beneficial microscopic organisms, bacteria, and solids. This converts the non-settleable solids (dissolved and colloidal matter) into settleable solids, carbon dioxide, water, and energy.

  8. How One Wastewater Treatment Plant Saved Time And Money Measuring Turbidity And TSS
    The wastewater treatment plant of a major corporation is designed for a population capacity of 6 million people and is considered a very large wastewater treatment plant.
  9. Primary Wastewater Treatment: Influent Monitoring

    The raw sewage entering a wastewater treatment plant comes from a variety of sources. In addition to effluent from domestic users, effluent from industrial users and storm water run off can be present.

  10. New Ultrasonic Flow Meters Improve Biogas Measurements

    As interest in biogas grows, more attention is being paid to measuring biogas flow, which has long been a problem area in process measuring technology.