Wastewater Treatment Application Notes

  1. Degassing Sea Water Has Never Been This Compact, Efficient, And Adaptable
    6/27/2017

    3M™ Liqui-Cel™ Membrane Contactors offer a modular skid option for off-shore oil platforms that is significantly smaller and lighter than traditional vacuum towers.

  2. Wastewater Treatment Facility Complements On-Line Monitoring With Automated Control
    7/15/2014

    The Minnesota River Valley Public Utilities Commission (MRVPUC) provides wastewater treatment for the City of Le Sueur and the City of Henderson in south-central Minnesota. A significant factor facing the utility is the highly varying phosphorus load that challenges operators to meet the utility’s annual average discharge limit of 1.0 mg/L total phosphorus.

  3. Application Note: Environmental Applications Of The Agilent 1290 Infinity UHPLC: The Evolution Of Chromatography
    2/6/2011
    This application note presents examples of the use of UHPLC (ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography) for environmental applications using the new Agilent 1290 Infinity LC. By E. Michael Thurman and Imma Ferrer Center for Environmental Mass Spectrometry Department of Environmental Engineering University of Colorado Boulder, CO, USA
  4. Aerated Biological Nitrogen Removal
    7/16/2013

    Excess ammonia in receiving waters causes algal blooms that decrease oxygen levels. For this reason, many wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) must limit ammonia in discharge. Mike Rousey, Hach Company

  5. Mapping And Identifying The Source Of Water Quality Issues
    6/28/2017

    A Southern U.S. municipality experiencing taste and odor issues in a certain neighborhood was also having difficulty maintaining chlorine residual levels in the area. Biological growth was suspected, however, water leaving the treatment plant met and exceeded all water quality requirements. After several investigations, the source of contamination in the distribution system could still not be identified.

  6. Optimizing Air Flows To Aeration Basins
    4/17/2014

    As a result of clean energy mandates and the rising cost of energy, wastewater treatment facilities around the country are retrofitting their instrumentation to run highly efficient, cost-effective, clean facilities. To reduce emissions and produce clean energy, solid wastes are often digested in large digester tanks to reduce the volume of waste (sludge) and produce more biogas, which is then used as fuel in the cogeneration process. However, a clean environment calls for not just clean air and clean energy, but clean water as well.

  7. Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen: Simplified With s-TKN™
    7/15/2013

    The Dallas County Water and Sewer Authority (DCWSA) in Selma, Alabama recently found itself in a tough spot: under the scrutiny of the Alabama Department of Environmental Management (ADEM). The wastewater treatment system needed better means for control. Ammonia, TSS, cBOD, and TKN readings were out of compliance. Then they discovered a new testing method known as simplified-TKN (s-TKN), and with it, better process control to achieve regulatory compliance. By Andrew Antonio, Municipal Wastewater Market Manager and Derek Walker, Applications Development Manager

  8. Active Energy Control – Energy Reductions Of Up To 10% Above Standard Drives
    4/1/2017

    Energy costs continue to increase. At the same time, there is increased pressure to reduce utility bills without sacrificing operations or comfort.

  9. Improving Compliance Through Real-Time Phosphorus Control
    4/18/2017

    Levels of phosphorus, a chemical element that promotes organic growth, must be controlled in wastewater coming from beverage, food and dairy processing plants. Failure to control phosphorus accurately has a negative impact on water quality and can lead to large fines.

  10. Disinfection And Emerging Contaminant Removal With HyDOZ®
    3/20/2014

    In the summer of 2012, BlueInGreen partnered with a facility in Arkansas to study disinfection of wastewater and removal of emerging contaminants of concern (ECC) by utilizing dissolved ozone. The plant has a firm capacity of 12 MGD and includes primary clarification, activated sludge, secondary clarification, and sand filtration prior to the existing UV system.