Wastewater Regulations and Legislation

  1. California To Regulate Marijuana Wastewater
    8/9/2017

    California regulators are getting closer to regulating waste discharges by marijuana growers.

  2. Governor Starts Probe Of Niagara Falls Wastewater Discharge
    8/3/2017

    After black, smelly water from a wastewater treatment plant enveloped parts of Niagara Falls this past weekend, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo is calling for a state investigation of potential breaches of water quality standards.

  3. Defense Spending Could Be A Vehicle For PFC Bills
    8/1/2017

    Pennsylvania lawmakers are trying to pass water contamination legislation as part of a major defense spending bill.

  4. North Carolina Regulators Fight GenX Contamination
    7/20/2017

    North Carolina regulators lowered the standard for GenX in drinking water this month as the state grapples with contamination in the Cape Fear River.

  5. Pulp-And-Paper Takes On Florida Wastewater Regulations
    7/19/2017

    The pulp-and-paper industry is taking on Florida’s water quality regulations, and the courts recently cleared the way for the challenge.

  6. Hawaii Officials Want Tougher Wastewater Rules
    7/10/2017

    Officials in Hawaii are lobbying the state to bolster its wastewater treatment regulations.

  7. Despite Contamination, New Hampshire PFC Bill Fails
    6/26/2017

    Lawmakers in New Hampshire took a stand this year against perfluorinated chemical (PFC) contamination, but the effort ultimately failed to cross the finish line.

  8. Cyanide Wastewater Discharged In Mississippi
    6/5/2017

    A wastewater treatment plant in Mississippi has run afoul of regulators by discharging cyanide into waterways.

  9. Amid PFC Scandal, Congress Tells Pentagon To Disclose Water Contamination
    6/2/2017

    Under a new deal struck by Congress, the Pentagon must disclose incidents of water contamination at military bases.

  10. Reaching Legal Impasse, Iowa Utility Plans $15 Million Nutrient Removal Facility
    6/1/2017

    Des Moines Water Works tried to compel the agricultural sector to pay more for nutrient pollution cleanup, but the attempt ended in failure. Now the utility plans to invest heavily in addressing the problem on its own.