More Wastewater Industry Features

  1. Green City, Clean Waters Plan Puts Quality First In Philly
    7/15/2017

    Cities all over the country have been prioritizing clean water through a variety of different programs and the City of Brotherly Love is among the ranks.

  2. DC Water’s Unconventional Approach To Utility Management
    1/15/2018

    Over the past 10 years, DC Water has become the harbinger of the modern water utility. It’s often unconventional approach to tackling age-old problems usually elicits one of two responses from other utility professionals. The first response is one of resignation — if only I had the budget that size permits, I’d be able to do similar things. And the second is one of awe — there’s no way I have the amount of gumption to convince regulators or customers that I have a better way.

  3. Navajo Water Project Provides Clean Water To Native Americans
    3/15/2017

    It may seem farfetched, but the reality is that many Americans don’t have regular access to clean drinking water.

  4. Affordable Sewer For Small Communities
    1/12/2018

    Affordability and maintainability are two of the greatest challenges small municipalities face when constructing and managing sewer infrastructure. With these challenges in mind, it’s important for small cities to choose wisely when investing in a wastewater system that needs to last for 30-60 years.

  5. Pulling Together: Public-Private Partnerships Poised To Push California Water Efficiency
    4/11/2017

    California is home to some of the world’s most creative minds, top universities, productive farmland, groundbreaking industries — and one of the most epic droughts. The state has endured five years of drained reservoirs and groundwater reserves tapped so aggressively that the land subsidence caused by pumping has been literally seen from space. This indicates in no uncertain terms that it’s time to get all hands on deck. Private companies, universities, irrigation and drainage districts, municipalities — it’s time to pull together into public-private partnerships to address water challenges that face California and so many other regions of the world.

  6. Continuous Simulation: Make Stormwater Assets Great Again
    7/6/2017

    More than 20 years ago I wrote a Master’s Thesis about software tools that could be put together with EPA SWMM to create a toolbox for very long term continuous simulation for stormwater and watershed simulations. I was inspired at the time by Dr. William James who was my advisor for that research. 

  7. Mountain Regional Water District Deploys Next Generation On-Site Hypochlorite And Tank Mixing Technology To Meet Expanding Water Management Needs
    7/16/2018

    The Mountain Regional Water District is a Special Service District of the county that was established by the Summit County Commission in 2000 to regionalize water service by consolidating several public and private water companies.

  8. An Open Letter To Michelle Obama On Water
    2/14/2017

    Now that you have returned to the role of private citizen — though, admittedly you are a private citizen with millions of eyes focused on you — I want to encourage you to continue your great work promoting the health of our nation’s children. Your emphasis on exercise and nutrition, jobs and support for veterans, and education have touched millions of Americans of all ages and all backgrounds. Now it’s time to bring in the most common denominator and the first step toward good health — access to clean water.

  9. What Happens To The Chesapeake Bay Now?
    1/15/2018

    One of the great turnaround stories in the history of our nation’s water bodies is that of the Chesapeake Bay. Since 1976 when the Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) first undertook a comprehensive study of the Bay, efforts to address excessive nitrogen and phosphorous degradation of water quality have steadily improved the Bay’s complex ecosystem.

  10. Tackling Combined Sewage Overflows (CSOs) In New York
    8/15/2017

    New York City treats 1.3 billion gallons of wastewater a day across its 14 wastewater treatment plants. The city has seen a precipitous drop in fecal coliforms, with the NYC Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) reporting that fecal coliforms per 100 mL of water has fallen from 1,000 in 1972 when the Clean Water Act was passed to closer to 10 as of 2009.