Water Industry Features

  1. Is Water Shortage The Next Big Short?
    2/4/2016

    At the end of The Big Short, a postscript stated that one of the story's protagonists, Dr. Michael Burry (played by Christian Bale), was now focused on investing in only one commodity: water. That got my attention.

  2. Carbon Adsorption & Reactivation
    8/2/2016

    Chemical, petrochemical, and oil-refining plants are process-intensive operations with regulatory requirements to protect the surrounding water and air from the effects of industrial pollution. These external demands are matched by equally compelling internal pressures to address product purification needs, find alternatives to utilizing costly fresh water in production processes, reduce the carbon footprint, and operate efficiently and profitably.

  3. ORP Sensors – Are They Really The Best Thing “Since Sliced Bread”?
    12/12/2016

    There have been many publications lately that claim universal appeal of the ORP sensors and their applicability across the board. This concerns me, because the authors sometimes forget to mention some well-known practical limitations of the method, let alone the realities of water treatment applications potentially influencing the sensor performance.

  4. The Benefits Of Continuous Monitoring Of Phosphate In Corrosion Control
    7/15/2016

    When Flint Michigan discontinued purchasing water from the Detroit Water Authority and began using the Flint River as their raw water source they unfortunately did not consider the potential impact on lead and copper corrosion and the impact on the public.

  5. 5 Burning Questions On Uranium And Radium Removal
    10/17/2016

    High levels of radionuclides (uranium/radium/etc.) in drinking water aren’t very common, but they are very dangerous. If you’ve long dealt with radionuclides, you’re familiar with the treatment requirements — but are you treating as cost effectively as possible?

  6. Lessons Learned From Flint
    7/31/2016

    We all hope that the Flint Water Crisis – where cost-cutting measures led to the drinking water supply to become severely tainted with lead – was an isolated incident. However, it is not impossible that a similar event could happen again, especially in a similarly  desperate city with limited financial resources. Here are a few key points that should be considered to avoid repeating such a tragedy.

  7. Power Plant Water: Wanted Dead And Alive
    7/17/2017

    Water is the lifeblood of electrical power plants, whether they are water-cooled steam plants or turbine-spinning hydroelectric installations. Regardless of how the facility generates electricity, there is a growing awareness that each power plant is part of its own, unique industrial watershed — drawing water from the environment, altering its contents and temperature, releasing some to the atmosphere as steam, and returning the rest to receiving waters.