SCADA & Automation Case Studies and White Papers

  1. Energy Savings In Water And Wastewater Systems
    2/13/2018

    This white paper addresses how hydraulic models can be used to instantiate energy savings by reducing energy waste, promote better efficiencies in operating a pumping system, and exploit flexible energy tariffs available in the market place.

  2. WaterGEMS® Prioritizes Manila Water Facilities For Disaster Resiliency And Contingency Plan
    2/1/2018

    Located on the Pacific Ring of Fire, the Philippines experience frequent earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and typhoons that cause catastrophic losses. Manila Water Company, Inc., prepared a Natural Calamity Risk Resiliency and Mitigation Masterplan to ensure that there is a reliable water supply in the event of a natural disaster for the service area covering the East Zone of Metro Manila (the National Capital Region) and Rizal Province. 

  3. Asset Lifecycle Information Management For Water And Wastewater Networks
    2/1/2018

    Water and wastewater leaders are unsung heroes. Clean, safe water is essential to human life and to the well-being of the environment, yet it is grossly underfunded. Limited resources lead to deferred maintenance and difficult decisions.

  4. Advanced Strategies To Extend The Life Of Your Water Network
    1/16/2018

    Water utilities face many challenges including aging infrastructure, constrained resources and revenue shortfalls. Most utilities use various technological resources to manage their assets and increase efficiency. Resources may include Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI), Geographic Information Systems (GIS), hydraulic models, asset management systems, network sensors, Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems and billing databases. Unfortunately, those resources are often managed in “silos.”

  5. Scalable SCADA: Deploying Ignition In Any Architecture
    1/9/2018

    The Internet continues to transform the way business is done, industries are in transition, new markets are opening, and consumer habits are shifting. Even if your architecture is working well now, is it scalable enough to adapt to unpredictable changes?

  6. Smarter SCADA Alarming
    1/9/2018

    One afternoon at a waste water treatment facility, an alarm goes off when the water pressure gets too high in one of the tanks. The alarm is set at priority level 4, which means “critical,” but it doesn’t stand out because almost every other alarm at the facility is set at that level. Besides, the operator can’t acknowledge it right away because he’s dealing with several other alarms that went off a few minutes earlier – which he doesn’t yet realize are just “nuisance alarms.”

  7. Making Your Old SCADA System New Again
    1/9/2018

    When it comes time to update, it's a prime opportunity to consider switching over to new software that offers improved functionality instead of dumping more money into just keeping your existing software up-to-date.

  8. Four Ways Ignition SCADA Speeds Development
    1/9/2018

    Have you ever been trapped in “development hell”? If you’ve been involved in developing software applications, you can probably relate to the feeling. Modern technologies offer many promising possibilities for your enterprise, but the actual process of development can feel endless and painful, especially for control engineers or other professionals who may not have extensive training in software development. In this white paper, learn about the development platform.

  9. Ignition Gets Data Flowing For Water District
    12/26/2017

    Western Municipal Water District replaced their full SCADA system using Ignition.

  10. Roy Hill Iron Ore Optimizes Water Infrastructure Design And Operations For AUD 10 Billion Mining Facility
    12/20/2017

    In the Pilbara region of Western Australia, 1,200 kilometers northeast of Perth, Roy Hill Iron Ore (Roy Hill) is developing an open pit, bulk mining facility capable of processing 55 megatons of iron ore annually. Set to be the country’s largest iron ore mining operation, the AUD 10 billion project includes a water supply and dewatering network spanning 300 square kilometers that needs continuous adapting to meet the changing mining and ore processing requirements over the 20-year life of the mine (LOM).