Resiliency Solutions & Insight for Utility Managers

  1. Got Water? Thank (And Save) A Forest

    “When the well’s dry,” Benjamin Franklin once said, “we know the worth of water.” Today, our freshwater supplies face serious threats — including drought, wildfire, and other impacts of a warming climate. From California to Cape Town, the worth of water has become crystal clear.

  2. Climate-Ready Or Not?

    There are many positive changes on the horizon for the water and wastewater industry — new ideas and technologies that should enable more efficient and reliable operations, better water quality, and cost savings — but the forecast for the future is not all sunshine. There are some storm clouds brewing, literally, and water system managers need to prepare for the impact of severe rains.

  3. Binational Water Leaders Explore Future Solutions At Two Nations One Water Border Summit

    One thing was certain after the Two Nations One Water: U.S.-Mexico Border Water Summit concluded March 2 at El Paso Water’s TecH2O Learning Center. Policymakers, researchers and industry experts from both sides of the border care deeply about water sustainability and are committed to solutions to ensure the long-term vitality of their respective communities. About 300 convened at the two-day event, eager and ready to work together.

  4. Crowdsourcing The First Water Management Database — With A Little Help From Companies

    From Cape Town to Puerto Rico to Flint, Michigan, it's no surprise that drought, flooding and water pollution can devastate communities, impacting lives and hindering economic growth. But the physical components of water supply – its abundance or scarcity, levels of pollution, and the competition over it — are only half of the equation when it comes to overall water security. What's just as important is how water is managed by public institutions, such as water utilities and local governments.

  5. Hurricane Harvey Wreaked Havoc On People’s Health — Texas Should Be Better Prepared Next Time

    The National Hurricane Center in January confirmed what many Texans already knew: Hurricane Harvey’s overwhelming rainfall — and the devastation it left behind — was unlike anything recorded in U.S. history.

  6. Share The Wealth: A Cap-And-Trade System Of Water Conservation And Resiliency?

    California has struggled with drought for most of the last decade. From 2011-2015, the state experienced the driest four-year stretch in recorded history, leading to unprecedented water restrictions for residents, including a state mandate to reduce water use by 25 percent.

  7. Hurricane Harvey: Climate Change, Staggering Costs, And People At The Heart Of It All

    Texans are no stranger to the devastation of hurricanes. I still vividly remember, as a young child in Austin, being scared of Alicia in 1983 — and thankful that we lived at the top of the hill. Alicia caused nearly $2 billion in damages, a record at the time, and the category 3 storm was so destructive that its name was retired. But only a few years later, that record was broken...

  8. 3 Things Cities Can Learn From Cape Town’s Impending 'Day Zero' Water Shut-Off

    Cape Town is running out of water. After three years of intense drought, South Africa’s second-largest city is just a few months away from “Day Zero,” the day when the city government will shut off water taps for most homes and businesses.

  9. A 'SWIFT' Approach To Managed Aquifer Recharge

    The Sustainable Water Initiative for Tomorrow (SWIFT) will not only restore declining levels to the Potomac Aquifer System, but it will also reduce nutrient discharges to the Chesapeake Bay.

  10. Flood-Proofing For Wastewater Treatment Plants

    As recent history has taught us, flooding from storm surge can pose major difficulties for treatment plants. One town that saw the damage wrought by Hurricane Sandy firsthand has undergone the type of flood protection innovation that any operation can emulate, if they only know how.