Nutrient Removal Case Studies and White Papers

  1. Aerobic Digester Reduces Nutrient Return And Improves Energy Efficiency
    1/8/2019

    Faced with rising operational costs due to increasing energy and chemical prices, as well as stricter effluent permit limits, many operators and engineers are turning to performance optimizers and controls automation to enhance treatment processes and reduce operating costs while limiting capital expenses.

  2. World’s Largest Denitrification Plant Helps Tampa Bay Reduce Nutrient Pollution
    10/2/2018

    Nutrient pollution is getting worse in many estuaries throughout the United States, especially those on the heavily populated East Coast.

  3. Denitrification Filters Meet Strict, Varying Nitrogen Limits
    10/1/2018

    The cities of Littleton and Englewood, CO, just south of Denver, share a wastewater plant — the Littleton/Englewood advanced wastewater treatment (AWT) plant located in Englewood. The 7886 m3/hr (50-mgd) Littleton/Englewood AWT plant serves more than 300,000 residents in the Denver metropolitan area. The facility also receives sewage from 21 districts within a 75 square mile service area. Plant effluent is discharged to the Denver metro area’s major watershed, the South Platte River.

  4. Award-Winning Design Helps WWTP Protect Chesapeake Bay Watershed
    9/26/2018

    Arlington County’s Water Pollution Control Plant (WPCP) in South Arlington, VA, is located on 35 acres of land squeezed into a commercial/residential neighborhood less than a mile west of Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport. The facility treats flows from nearly all of Arlington. In addition, nearly 20 percent of the plant’s flow comes from neighboring localities such as Alexandria, Fairfax County, and Falls Church. Effluent from the plant is discharged into Four Mile Run to the south, which feeds into the Potomac River and, ultimately, the Chesapeake Bay.

  5. Methanol Dosing Technology Helps Denitrification System Pass Rigorous Performance Test
    9/25/2018

    In 2007, Greenville, SC-based Western Carolina Regional Sewer Authority (WCRSA) conducted a rigorous performance test on a new tertiary treatment technology to assess its ability to effectively remove nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) without using excess amounts of methanol at its Lower Reedy Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP).

  6. Denitrification/Filtration Technology Helps Wastewater Treatment Plant Meet China’s Stringent Class 1A Standards
    9/25/2018

    As a result of China’s rapid economic development in recent years, the country has implemented more stringent environmental standards. Local environmental protection departments now require most urban wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) to apply strict enforcement measures to meet Class IA effluent discharge standards according to the Discharge Standard of Pollutants for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant (GB18918-2002).

  7. Harmful Algae: How To Stay Ahead Of The Bloom
    9/6/2018

    It’s the call no water treatment plant superintendent wants to receive, especially not while on vacation. Andy McClure, Superintendent of Toledo, Ohio’s Collins Park Water Treatment Plant, answered his phone to hear his head of operations report that the level of microcystin in the finished water was high, caused by a large harmful algal bloom (HAB) that was impacting the plant’s Lake Erie intake.

  8. Polyblend® Mechanical Polymer Activation System Outperforms Hydraulic Polymer Mixing Unit
    7/1/2018

    Henry N. Wochholz Regional Water Recycling Facility (WRWRF) consists of primary, advanced biological secondary and tertiary treatment with advanced total nitrogen removal. Always interested in enhanced treatment performance, the staff members recently examined the polymer use of the existing dewatering belt filter presses. 

  9. Aerobic Treatment Of Wastewater For Fish Flour And Fish Oil Company Reuse
    6/29/2018

    A fish flour and fish oil processing company produces 100 tons of flour a day from fish waste resulting from the broth concentration plant and from drying of flour, washing water, boiler blowdown and cooling towers. The company needed to treat its wastewater and to reduce its water supply costs.

  10. Savings Helps MABRs Gain Traction In Municipalities
    5/9/2018

    An MABR is essentially a biological wastewater treatment process that utilizes seemingly passive aeration through oxygen-permeable membranes. Oxygen transfer through the MABR membranes is diffusion based: driven by concentration differences such that oxygen passes from air at atmospheric pressure into water at a higher hydrostatic pressure. This oxygen transfer mechanism, wherein air is supplied to the process at very low pressure, is the reason MABRs have significantly lower energy consumption compared to other wastewater treatment processes, such as conventional activated sludge (CAS), that utilize diffusers. This energy savings is one of the key reasons MABRs are gaining traction in the municipal wastewater industry.