Nutrient Removal Case Studies and White Papers

  1. Optimizing Chemical Dosing Reduces Chemical Use While Meeting Effluent TP Limits
    11/9/2017

    The city of Black River Falls in Wisconsin used chemical treatment with ferric chloride (FeCl3) to achieve their effluent total phosphorus (TP) permit of 1.0 mg/l. Historically, the chemical dosing rate was manually adjusted on a daily basis based on the measured effluent TP concentration. The plant was upgraded with an OSCAR process performance optimizer control system with phosphorus controller, which uses continuous measurement of orthophosphate. Read the full case study to learn more.

  2. Do More With Less: Integrating Nutrient Removal Control Improves Treatment Capacity And Efficiency
    11/9/2017

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) are facing many challenges. Permits on nitrogen and phosphorus in the effluent water are progressively becoming stricter in order to protect surface waters from eutrophication. At the same time, plants are required to reduce both energy and chemical consumption and are often challenged with limited time and staff. In total, they are required to do more with less. In order to meet these challenges, a plant with a Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR) in Green Lake, Wisconsin was upgraded with an advanced process control system – the OSCAR process performance optimizer with NURO controller.

  3. Efficacy Of Electrocoagulation Technology On Selenium-Contaminated Mine Effluent
    9/25/2017

    This paper helps to understand the efficacy of BakerCorp Electrocoagulation (EC) technology and treatment process in treating selenium-contaminated mine effluent. Two mine effluent samples were treated by Baker EC. Selenium constituent concentrations in both water samples were reduced significantly to below reporting qualification limits. Based on the results of the effluent samples, electrocoagulation is an effective treatment option for waste streams found to contain selenium.

  4. Granular Activated Carbon: A Long-Term Solution For Meeting DPB Compliance
    7/31/2017

    When the Cobb County-Marietta Water Authority (CCMWA) anticipated the need to upgrade the Hugh A. Wyckoff water treatment plant, they turned to granular activated carbon (GAC) technology after vetting several alternatives. The plant, a wholesaler in a two-plant system, processes up to 72 million gallons per day and serves about 350,000 people. Comprising of Wyckoff and the James E. Quarles treatment plant, CCMWA is the second largest water provider in Georgia.

  5. A Wastewater Solution With Low Capital Costs
    7/17/2017

    Along the Indian River Lagoon adjacent to Vero Beach, Florida, both residents and government officials were becoming increasingly concerned about excessive nutrient loads and pollution.

  6. Polyblend® Mechanical Polymer Activation System Outperforms Hydraulic Polymer Mixing Unit
    6/8/2017

    Henry N. Wochholz Regional Water Recycling Facility (WRWRF) consists of primary, advanced biological secondary and tertiary treatment with advanced total nitrogen removal. Always interested in enhanced treatment performance, the staff members recently examined the polymer use of the existing dewatering belt filter presses. 

  7. Aerobic Granular Sludge System Reduces Energy Up To 50% When Compared To Conventional Activated Sludge Systems
    2/1/2017

    The AquaNereda® Aerobic Granular Sludge System (AGS) is an innovative biological wastewater treatment technology that provides advanced treatment using the unique features of aerobic granular biomass. This advanced nutrient removal process can reduce footprint up to 75% and energy up to 50% when compared to conventional activated sludge systems.

  8. The World’s Largest Drinking Water Plant Using Ozone Serves 1.6 Million Customers
    1/20/2017

    Facing new limits on acceptable levels of DBPs in the drinking water, as well as age-old complaints about the taste of the water during the summer algal bloom, the North Texas Municipal Water District turned to ozone disinfection as a possible alternative able to address both concerns.

  9. Improving Total Nitrogen Removal
    10/21/2016

    To protect the sensitive waters of the Neuse River Basin, the State of North Carolina formally adopted a nutrient management strategy in 1997 which established Total Maximum Daily Loads for all point source contributors of Total Nitrogen (TN) to the Neuse River. By upgrading its oxidation ditches, this Eastern NC plant saw a reduction of 76% TN compared to its average discharge from the past 6 years.

  10. ACTIFLO And Hydrotech Discfilter: A Two Stage Process
    10/18/2016

    The state of Minnesota instituted a new water quality requirement that limits cities along the Minnesota River to a 1 mg/L Total Phosphorus limit by 2015 to prevent algae blooms and resulting pollution problems.