Drinking Water Treatment Case Studies and White Papers

  1. Asset Lifecycle Information Management For Water And Wastewater Networks
    2/1/2018

    Water and wastewater leaders are unsung heroes. Clean, safe water is essential to human life and to the well-being of the environment, yet it is grossly underfunded. Limited resources lead to deferred maintenance and difficult decisions.

  2. Case Study: Aquatech’s Seawater Reverse Osmosis Plant Succeeds In India
    7/23/2010
    India’s first Ultra Mega Power Project (UMPP) at Mundra in Coastal Gujarat, a 4,000 MW coal-fired plant, is owned by Coastal Gujarat Power Limited (CGPL). CGPL will draw seawater from the Mundra coast for various utilities and for their main boiler. Aquatech has been awarded the contract for executing the 4,622 GPM (permeate) capacity seawater reverse osmosis plant (SWRO).
  3. Wastewater Plant In Como, Italy, Upgrades To De Nora Ozone For Significant Savings
    9/13/2018

    The Lariana Depur wastewater treatment plant in Fino Mornasco, Italy, treats wastewater from multiple textile manufacturers in the Como region, known as the heart of the textile industry. Since 1994, ozone has been used effectively as a polisher to remove the dark blue-purple color — the result of the dyes used in the textile dyeing and printing process — from the water.

  4. Electromagnetic Flowmeter Survives Floods
    6/18/2013

    When the Village of Windsor, New York replaced its mechanical flowmeter with an electromagnetic flowmeter in 2003, it was with high hopes that the newer technology would be less prone to failure and require less maintenance.

  5. Chlorine vs. Chloramine: A Tale Of Two Chemistries
    4/17/2018

    In drinking water treatment’s ongoing battle between disinfection and disinfection byproducts (DBPs), most water utility customers are oblivious to the process. One thing they do notice, however, is when their water smells or tastes bad. Here are some insights that can help water treatment plant (WTP) operators deal with their internal concerns about DBPs and residual chlorine or ammonia levels, as well as their external concerns about customer perceptions of water quality.

  6. Think You Know ORP? Get 5 pH/ORP Measurement Tips
    6/29/2017

    Water and wastewater treatment professionals are constantly looking for as much information as possible about the quality of their water. If knowledge is power, then understanding the properties of their water is key to running an effective and efficient facility.

  7. How Experts Justify The Cost Of Comprehensive SCADA In Drinking Water Plants
    5/31/2016

    Due to their critical role in protecting the health of customers, drinking water treatment systems require a high degree of care and oversight.

  8. Upgrading DWTP Operations In Kansas With The QbD1200 TOC Analyzer
    7/26/2017

    For drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs), the EPA’s Disinfection Byproduct Rule (DBP) is a way of life. Unfortunately, for many facilities the equipment and operations haven’t evolved with the regulation mandates, leaving facilities in a tough spot. For a DWTP in Douglas County, KS, its challenges with accurate TOC measurement and testing, along with expensive calibrations and extended downtime with its prior TOC analyzer led it to trialing the Hach QbD1200 TOC Analyzer. Read the full case study to learn more.

  9. Robust Encore® Pumps Replace Peristaltic Hose Pumps To Maintain Consistent pH For Finished Drinking Water
    8/22/2018

    Upper Deerfield Township, NJ relies on groundwater from four wells measuring 120 to 160 feet deep. The water is treated at two treatment plants with a capacity of 2.2 MGD and then pumped out to the distribution system with approximately 750,000 gallons of storage. Since the deep groundwater is hard, operators add lime to the finished water to raise the pH to reduce hardness.

  10. Color Reduction From RO Concentrate
    3/3/2015

    The City of Palm Coast, FL was experiencing elevated color in the concentrate stream being directed to the lime softening facility to recover as drinking water. In an effort to meet secondary color standards at the lime plant, this water quality issue limited the volume of the concentrate able to be recovered.