Drinking Water Source

  1. Massachusetts Raw Sewage Challenges Run Deep
    1/19/2018

    Massachusetts faces a deep problem with raw sewage.

  2. EPA Overstates Its Work On Superfund Cleanup
    1/16/2018

    Though the current U.S. EPA administration is boasting about its action to clean up the nation’s Superfund sites, it appears that it has not done as much as implied.

  3. Study: Radium Rampant In Texas Water
    1/16/2018

    Texas has a problem with radium contamination in its drinking water, according to a new study from researchers at the nonprofit Environmental Working Group (EWG).

  4. Utah Bills Would Upend Water Utility Policy
    1/12/2018

    Proposals under consideration in the Utah legislature could dramatically curb the powers of water systems in the state.

  5. Thousands Of Puerto Ricans Still Waiting On Clean Water
    1/11/2018

    Four months after Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico, many residents still lack access to clean water.

  6. Ohio EPA Awarded Record $936 Million In 2017 Water/Wastewater Loans
    1/10/2018

    With cuts being made to the budget of the federal EPA, individual states are having to step up and take matters of protecting drinking and source water into their own hands. Last year, none were more forceful with this change than Ohio.

  7. With EPA Cuts, Critics Fear Loss Of Water Oversight
    1/9/2018

    As the U.S. EPA is reshaped under President Trump, some are concerned over what has been reported as an “exodus” of employees from the agency.

  8. NH Lawmakers To Consider 12 Water-Related Bills This Month
    1/8/2018

    The New Hampshire legislature plans to weigh a bevy of water bills this month.

  9. Conservation At U.S. Water Utilities On The Rise
    1/4/2018

    On average, water use by U.S. ratepayers appears to be dropping. Americans used 6 fewer gallons of water on a daily basis in 2015 compared to 2010.

  10. San Diego’s Post-Drought Water Woes: Lead, Sewage, Non-Revenue Water
    1/4/2018

    Despite the fact that California’s drought is over, San Diego’s water worries have not evaporated.