Drinking Water Measurement

  1. Turbidity 101: What It Is, And Why It Is So Important
    6/12/2018

    Turbidity, a measure of the cloudiness or haziness of a fluid, was originally intended as a qualitative measure of the aesthetics of drinking water. It is not a measure of actual particles in the water; it measures how much those particles affect light being transmitted through the water, or how that light reflects off particles in the water. Today’s turbidity designs and methods have been regimented in an attempt to bring quantitative consistency to the measurement for both aesthetic and pathogenic qualities of drinking water.

  2. Drinking Water Turbidity Monitoring: 7 Key Considerations
    6/11/2018

    Turbidity, as a measure of cloudiness or haze in water, has many useful applications for industrial processes, pharmaceutical manufacturing, environmental monitoring, and utility applications. Unlike general commercial applications, however, the use of turbidity readings in municipal drinking water treatment comes with unique demands and considerations related to regulatory compliance.

  3. Turbidity’s Role In EPA Compliance
    6/11/2018

    Turbidity measurement is both a nebulous, oft-misunderstood concept and the master link in a chain of events affecting U.S. EPA drinking water compliance. It can influence, or be influenced by, almost every other link in a water treatment process. Here is a quick overview of turbidity’s relationship to drinking water compliance standards and some tips for keeping a water treatment process in balance.

  4. Water Treatment Analytics: A Road Map To Greater Efficiency
    6/5/2018

    From the largest metropolitan water treatment plant (WTP) or wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) operations to the smallest rural systems, the goals are essentially the same — achieve regulatory compliance and the most efficient results at the lowest practical cost. The most feasible (i.e., affordable) control solutions vary by process, plant size, and budgetary limitations. Here are several high-level guidelines to achieving a common strategy that works across virtually all applications: good data, properly analyzed, yields good results.

  5. A More Efficient Approach To EPA Stage 2 DBP Compliance
    4/20/2018

    Everyone wants pathogen-free drinking water, and adding chlorine is a great way to get it. Unfortunately, the dirtier a water treatment plant (WTP)’s raw water inflow — in terms of natural organic matter (NOM) or microbial organisms — the more disinfection byproducts (DBPs) the chlorination process will generate in the form of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). Those DBPs increase the risk of non-compliance with the U.S. EPA’s Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rules. Choosing the right instrumentation to measure NOM through spectral absorption coefficients (SACs) can have a big impact on treatment strategies — in terms of both costs and compliance performance.

  6. Clearing Up Misconceptions About Turbidimeter Performance And Calibration
    4/19/2018

    There is little doubt about the importance of taking turbidity readings as part of drinking water treatment. However, there are certain misperceptions about the associated requirements and procedures needed to confirm the validity of those readings. The major points of confusion seem to revolve around perception of the terms “approved,” “calibration,” and “validation.” Here is a quick synopsis on what you really need to know about meeting U.S. EPA Method 180.1: Determination of Turbidity by Nephelometry for accurate turbidity readings.

  7. Orchestrating Corrosion Control With Phosphate Analyzers
    4/18/2018

    As with so many other drinking water treatment processes, corrosion control demands a delicate balance among multiple factors. From the water-purifying chlorine that increases corrosion risk, to alternative strategies that reduce corrosion — using either elevated pH or phosphates — keeping corrosion under control requires sound strategy and reliable execution. Here are several approaches to addressing those conditions, along with options for better, more effective corrosion control.

  8. Chlorine vs. Chloramine: A Tale Of Two Chemistries
    4/17/2018

    In drinking water treatment’s ongoing battle between disinfection and disinfection byproducts (DBPs), most water utility customers are oblivious to the process. One thing they do notice, however, is when their water smells or tastes bad. Here are some insights that can help water treatment plant (WTP) operators deal with their internal concerns about DBPs and residual chlorine or ammonia levels, as well as their external concerns about customer perceptions of water quality.

  9. Digital Engineering Models Enable Comprehensive Lifecycle Information Management For Water And Wastewater Treatment Plants
    4/17/2018

    Water and wastewater treatment plant design is a large scale, complex engineering effort that requires a multi-discipline design team, often spread across many offices, and involving collaboration among different consulting firms, contractors, and owners.

  10. Revolutionizing Asset Management In The Water/Wastewater Industry
    4/17/2018

    The industrial world is awash with data and new information from sensors, applications, equipment, and people. But the data is worthless if it is left untouched or not used to its full potential to gain insights and make better decisions.