Contaminant Removal Case Studies and White Papers

  1. Examining Options To Reduce Lead In Drinking Water
    10/26/2016

    National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week marks a time when EPA and our federal partners promote education and awareness activities that focus on lead and how to prevent its negative health effects. This year, we focus on the theme, “Lead-Free Kids for a Healthy Future.” It’s through our joint efforts that we have been able to make significant strides in reducing exposure to lead over the past several decades.

  2. Full-Scale Installation Report For Z-92® Uranium Removal – Morongo Del Sur, CA
    8/8/2018

    The Golden State Water Company selected WRT’s Z-92® Uranium Removal treatment system to reduce high concentrations of uranium in a single treatment system for three wells located in the Morongo Valley of California.  Since installation of the Z-92® Uranium Removal treatment system in Morongo del Sur in 2013, the uranium levels are being reduced to levels below the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL).

  3. Eliminating A Silent Killer — A Critical Review On The Viability Of Decentralized Arsenic Removal Systems For Rural Communities
    9/20/2018

    Arsenic is a global environmental health issue. Since it was recognized in the nineties many techniques have been developed on the remediation on arsenic contaminated drinking water. Solving people’s exposure through drinking water to arsenic is, however, a complex problem.

  4. Processing Plant Uses Pre-filtration To Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) Filters With Pep Active Media
    2/7/2017

    A processing plant in Minnesota faced operational challenges due to ceramic dust from the manufacturing process passing through their clarifier, even with flocculent addition.

  5. Evaluation And Optimization Of Clean-In-Place Using Ozone
    8/15/2018

    A chemical company which specializes in Clean-In-Place (CIP) systems, contacted Mazzei to discuss the use of ozone as an alternative to peracetic acid sanitation or heat sterilization at their customers’ plants.

  6. Building Resilient Drinking Water Treatment Operations For A Sustainable Water Future
    5/14/2018

    It's spring and the algae are in bloom, but harmful algal blooms are far from the only threats to drinking water. Fortunately, there are advanced treatment technologies to handle some of the most persistent contaminants today, including algal toxins, Cryptosporidium, and 1,4-dioxane.

  7. Nitrification In Monochloramine-Treated Water
    5/9/2018

    A water utility in the Midwest USA uses Monochloramine treatment in their two surface water treatment plants to disinfect raw water and establish residual disinfectant prior to discharge to their distribution system. 

  8. Clarification And Filtration Upgrades Using ACTIFLO Technology
    1/12/2017

    The City of Somersworth has a historical background dating back to the early 1900s when it became the first community to start using chlorine to disinfect it’s drinking water.

  9. Cobb County Expands “Excellent Production Of Potable Water” With ClorTec® DN OSHG System
    8/3/2018

    De Nora’s ClorTec® DN OSHG systems feature market-driven innovations including robust PVC/FRP casings with end view ports, remote monitoring and control, and simple operation and maintenance with 100% access to every component. Systems from 12-3,000 lbs/day produce a guaranteed .8% hypochlorite concentration and feature the DSA® bipolar electrodes pioneered by De Nora. Read about how one community expanded their “excellent production of potable water” with the new ClorTec® DN OSHG System.

  10. On-Site Disinfection Generation Enables City To Provide High Quality Water For Industrial Food Processing Customers
    7/13/2018

    The city of Buhl, Idaho, obtains all of its drinking water from groundwater sources through multiple wells. Prior to 2009, the city did not treat the groundwater but only added chlorine in the form of bulk 12.5% sodium hypochlorite to provide a disinfectant residual. A combination of factors including: changes in EPA and state DEQ regulatory requirements, growth of the residential population and growth of the industrial food processing customers forced the City to build a new water treatment plant to provide filtration to address the naturally occurring arsenic present in the groundwater.