Drinking Water Disinfection [Case Studies White Paper]

  1. Taste and Odor Treatment with UV-Oxidation - Mississauga, Ontario (Case Study)
    7/7/2010

    The Region of Peel is the second-largest Canadian municipality after the city of Toronto, and draws its drinking water from Lake Ontario — the smallest of the five Great Lakes. To meet the projected population increase from 1,160,000 people currently to an estimated 1,571,000 people in 2031, the Region decided to upgrade and expand its water treatment plant. To deal with seasonal taste and odor compounds produced by algae blooms in Lake Ontario, the membrane plant will be equipped with a Trojan UV-Oxidation system.

  2. Water Works Commission Lowers Risk Profile By Converting To A Safer Disinfectant
    8/15/2016

    Chatsworth Water Works Commission provides both water and wastewater services to the 5,000 residents of the cities of Chatsworth and Eton, GA.

  3. Ohio Water Plant Finds Effective Alternative To Chlorine Gas
    5/14/2013

    For many years, Huber Heights, OH, searched for an effective and affordable way to eliminate gaseous chlorine (Cl2) use at its 4.46 MGD Needmore Road Water Treatment Plant. An innovative dry calcium hypochlorite makeup and delivery system now provides a safer disinfection method for operators and the community.

  4. Clarification And Filtration Upgrades Using ACTIFLO Technology
    1/12/2017

    The City of Somersworth has a historical background dating back to the early 1900s when it became the first community to start using chlorine to disinfect it’s drinking water.

  5. Residual Control Technology Saves Millions Of Gallons Of Water While Maintaining Consistent Chloramine Residual Levels
    12/5/2017

    Like many cities within the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex, the City of Coppell experienced water quality challenges at different periods throughout the year. In particular, the City had difficulty maintaining adequate chloramine residuals at the 1.5 MG Southwestern elevated storage tank during the warmer summer months when outdoor watering was restricted to conserve water.

  6. Drinking Water Disinfection – A History And Improved Monitoring Techniques
    7/3/2015

    In many countries we take for granted the availability and reliability of safe drinking water.  A recent trip outside of the US reminded me of this fact when I saw notices in the hotel rooms stating the drinking water met specific standards and was safe to drink however, my friends from the country emphatically warned me to not drink the water.

  7. The Basics Of Disinfection
    11/26/2012

    From utility water to wastewater, whether used in industrial processes or for drinking, disinfection plays a prominent role in providing safe and useable water. Water free from pathogens and other microorganisms ensures processes run efficiently and people are kept safe from disease. By Harland R Pond, Business Development Manager – Water Treatment

  8. General Electrochemistry
    7/28/2010

    All chemical processes involve the loss, gain, or redistribution of electrons on an atom or group of atoms. Electricity is the movement of electrons along a conductor. It is no wonder then that chemical changes can be made to occur by passing an electric current through a solution containing atoms or groups of atoms which will accept or give up electrons. Processes which pass an electrical current through a solution to effect chemical changes are called electrochemical processes. By PEPCON Systems

  9. Retrofit Significantly Reduces Backwash Cycle Interval, Duration And Water Use For Georgia Utility
    5/1/2017

    The North Columbus Resource Facility recently completed a $12-million replacement of its settled water filtration, removing the existing Wheeler filters, their three-part media and 10-inch poured concrete underdrains, which were no longer efficient.

  10. Hassle-Free Chlorination For Large Municipalities
    1/12/2016

    For Robert Stout, general manager of Mid-Arkansas Utilities (MAU), the primary water provider for a three-county rural area spanning 2,220 square miles, the reason to switch to a dry calcium hypochlorite feeding system was simple, “using chlorine gas was not only dangerous for us, it was a big hassle and time-consuming.”