AMI, AMR, and Metering Features

  1. Micrometers: A Simple Solution To Water Scarcity
    3/5/2018

    In the small community of Llimbe in Peru, water sources were running dry. The population had grown from 35 to 50 families, and some of the families were using more water than they actually needed. Because of this, if you lived higher on the hillside, you may only have water for an hour a day.

  2. Mueller Systems: The City Of Clayton Reduces Non-Revenue Water, Improves Customer Service And Operational Efficiency With Hot Rod™
    12/20/2012

    Clayton was plagued with exceptionally high non-revenue water rates in the 50 percent range. The city attributed the problem to leaks in its water system (parts of which have been in place the 1920s) that are exasperated by high pressure levels needed to pump water to more than 3200 service connections throughout Clayton’s mountainous terrain located 2200ft above sea level.

  3. Making The Most Of AMI
    7/13/2015

    The notion of advanced metering infrastructure (AMI), if not its practice, has become ubiquitous in the water industry. It’s hard to escape the feeling that following the evolution from manual to drive-by metering, the power and efficiency of AMI will soon become a utility standard.

  4. City of Troy Improves Customer Relationships And Billing Accuracy With AMI Solution
    3/28/2018

    Located just south of Montgomery, Alabama, the City of Troy is a unique mix of southern small-town charm and big-city amenities. Read the full case study to learn how the City leveraged Sensus’ Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) solution to gather more data and monitor for issues likes leaks or pipe breaks

  5. 8 Questions For Every Water Utility After The UCLA Water Main Break
    8/18/2014

    The water and mud from the big water main break that flooded the UCLA campus in Los Angeles in late July left behind several questions that could be asked of every water supplier in the country.  Find out for yourself how vulnerable your home town’s water supply is to leaks and breaks with these eight questions. By Ed Osann, NRDC senior water policy analyst

  6. Chicago Suburb Ensures Highest Water Quality Year-Round, Saves On Labor And Reagents With New Chlorine Analyzers
    5/18/2015

    For the Village of Lombard’s Water Division, consistently delivering high-quality tap water to the community’s nearly 44,000 residents and the businesses serving them was once quite a juggling act: constantly fixing old, temperamental analyzers; feeding reagents into the old analyzers; and staying ahead of callers complaining about “musty” water tastes and odors. Not today.

  7. One Of The Nation’s Best: Des Moines Water Works Incorporates Successful Fixed-Network AMR
    10/9/2008

    Deeply nestled in the state of Iowa’s capital city, Des Moines Water Works (DMWW) is ranked one of the nation’s best-operated water systems for continuously meeting the high expectations and future needs of its customers and municipal governments.

  8. 4 Key Water Themes Predicted To Shape 2015
    11/17/2014

    When considering the current state of the water and wastewater industry, water metering is an important part of the conversation.

  9. A Lesson In DMA Management
    3/28/2018

    White House Utility District (WHUD) is one of the largest water and sewer utilities in the state of Tennessee. While developing a network of pipelines, pumping stations and storage units was challenging, the greater test came in finding access to a plentiful water supply.

  10. Increase Revenue With New Commercial Metering Technology
    4/10/2017

    Revenue for water utilities is circling the drain. Most commercial water meters can stand up to the high water flow of commercial water customers, but these same meters often have a hard time measuring low water flows and retaining accurate meter reads over time and continuous flow conditions. Grocery stores, for example, do not pay for the scant amount of water used for produce misters because it passes through many commercial water meters without detection. These low flows add up to big dollars and are forcing water utilities to take a hard look at the accuracy of their meter fleet.