Views on Water Scarcity

  1. The Great Graywater Debate
    4/11/2014

    Widespread nonpotable reuse of graywater could potentially lead to a significant reduction in water demand, and over 8 million people across the U.S. are already using graywater for landscape irrigation. Yet most of the graywater reuse currently taking place is illegal. 

  2. Stormwater: A Valuable Resource For Power Plants?
    3/28/2014

    Stormwater is often thought of as a burden. Too much of it can overwhelm wastewater treatment facilities, flood communities, and lead to the pollution of lakes and rivers. There is debate on who’s in charge of it and how it should be managed. Several communities have invested millions, and some even billions, trying to control stormwater. Even chicken farmers have issues with stormwater.

  3. Is This The Future Of RO?
    12/11/2013

    A Q&A with Richard Stover, executive VP of Desalitech, discussing a reverse osmosis (RO) innovation that greatly increases recovery rates and overall efficiency, while also enhancing flexibility and reliability.

  4. Gravity Meets Groundwater Monitoring
    11/6/2013

    Water reserves deep below the Earth’s surface can be seen from outer space, thanks to satellites, the law of gravity, and some smart people who connected the dots.

  5. Direct Potable Reuse Vs. Indirect: Weighing The Pros And Cons
    11/4/2013

    There are two potable water reuse options currently gaining prevalence: direct potable reuse (DPR) and indirect potable reuse (IPR). Water Online shares pros and cons of each.

  6. For Drinking Water Utilities, The Heat Is On
    9/4/2013

    The Water Online offices lie just outside the confines of Philadelphia, where this summer we experienced the wettest June in 143 years of record-keeping.

  7. The 13 Biggest Challenges Facing The Water Industry
    8/16/2013

    Each year, the American Water Works Association (AWWA) surveys water professionals to identify the industry’s biggest challenges and concerns, while also providing key data to help support the development of solutions. In looking at the executive summary of this year’s State of the Water Industry report, I noticed some very familiar themes, but I was also struck by a few surprises.