Latest Insights on Water Reuse

  1. The Legal Push For Direct Potable Reuse
    3/27/2017

    Arizona is taking steps to allow for direct potable reuse throughout the drought-plagued state. With the practice legalized for wide use, its popularity around the world may rise.

  2. Overcoming Operations Challenges For Direct Potable Reuse
    3/20/2017

    The Water Environment & Reuse Foundation introduces a “bundle of research” to help direct potable reuse and its practitioners reach full potential.

  3. California And Potable Reuse’s Sustainable Momentum
    3/2/2017

    A new recycled water project in California is moving forward with plans to bolster the local drinking water supply.

  4. Reclaiming Water: The Rise Of Wastewater Recycling To Meet Potable Water Needs
    2/23/2017

    There’s roughly 32 billion gallons of municipal wastewater produced every day in the U.S., but according to a 2012 water reuse report by the U.S. EPA, less than 10 percent of that water is recycled.

  5. Changing Membranes And The Future Of Water
    2/7/2017

    A new fellowship has been awarded to students researching the latest advances in membrane technology and, perhaps, changing the future of water.

  6. 7 Keys To 'One Water'
    1/25/2017

    It’s a buzzword for the industry, but what does it really entail?

  7. Stepping Up Water Reuse — From Irrigation To Direct-Potable
    1/25/2017

    Water reuse is trending up. Here are nine developments to watch in 2017.

  8. Evolving From Controlled Biosolids Distribution To Revenue-Generating Compost
    1/25/2017

    Chicago continues its long tradition of innovative biosolids management by introducing a new model for sustainability and community service.

  9. One City, One Plan, One Water: How Los Angeles Is Transforming Water Management
    11/28/2016

    Carollo Engineers unveils an ambitious plan to turn one of America’s most water-stressed cities into a model of sustainability and resiliency.

  10. The Rise Of The Circular Economy In The Water World
    11/15/2016

    Since the industrial revolution, the total amount of waste has constantly grown as economic growth has been based on a ‘take-make-consume-dispose’ model. This linear model assumes that resources are abundant, available, and cheap to dispose of. In the U.S. and around the world, there is a move towards a ‘circular economy’ where products and waste materials are reused, repaired, refurbished, and recycled.