Drinking Water Analysis Application Notes

  1. Technical Note: Using 3M Liqui-Cel Membrane Contactors To Solve Resistivity Problems In A High Purity Water Loop
    1/30/2009

    Pureflow, Inc. is a Southeastern-based expert in designing complete water treatment systems as well as providing value-added solutions for fixing operational issues in existing systems. Pureflow teamed up with Membrana to help solve an operational issue at one of their customer’s facilities. By Membrana

  2. The Basics: ORP and Free Chlorine Monitoring
    5/13/2014

    Oxidation Reduction Potential or Redox is the activity or strength of oxidizers and reducers in relation to their concentration. Oxidizers accept electrons, reducers lose electrons. Examples of oxidizers are: chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, bromine, ozone, and chlorine dioxide. Examples of reducers are sodium sulfite, sodium bisulfate and hydrogen sulfide. Like acidity and alkalinity, the increase of one is at the expense of the other.

  3. Determination Of Pesticide Residues In Tea
    4/10/2015

    In 2012, Americans consumed well over 79 billion servings of tea, which is just over 3.60 billion gallons.

  4. Application Bulletin: Reverse Osmosis
    3/19/2008
    Osmosis is the phenomenon of lower dissolved solids in water passing through a semi-permeable membrane into higher dissolved solids water until a near equilibrium is reached
  5. Control Of Active Chlorine Disinfection By-Products (DBPs) Of Drinking Water Using The THM Plus Method
    4/13/2017

    Determining trihalomethane levels using standard analytical methods requires expensive equipment and highly qualified personnel, which also means that analysis costs are very high. For these reasons, trihalomethane analysis poses a serious problem for companies that supply drinking water. Read the full application note to learn how two drinking water laboratories improved quality control of water delivered to end users.

  6. Application Note: Continuous Monitoring Of Drinking Water Provides Assurance Of Safety
    9/28/2005
    A water utility in Ohio wanted to learn more about the variability of water quality parameters such as pH, ORP, turbidity, and chlorine. Previously, most of these parameters had been measured by spot sampling protocols with only a few measurements during a daily period. In order to more accurately assess the water variability, the utility used a YSI 6920DW Drinking Water Multiprobe
  7. Application Note: Water Flows From The Golden Hills Of California
    1/20/2010
    Each morning John Johnson drives the few miles from his smalltown home in northern California to the Center at Pardee Reservoir. Nestled among the foothills of the Sierra Nevada mountain range, the reservoir is a long 100 miles away from San Francisco Bay. By YSI
  8. New Water Turbidity Measurement Technology — The US Experience
    2/3/2017

    The amount of insoluble matter present in drinking water is an essential quality indicator. Silt, sand, bacteria, spores, and chemical precipitates all contribute to the cloudiness or turbidity of water. Drinking water (DW) which is highly turbid can be unpalatable and unsafe. Consumption of even low concentrations of certain bacteria and other microorganisms can cause serious health effects. Consequently, an accurate and sensitive measurement of turbidity is vital for ensuring that drinking water is free of these contaminants.

  9. Application Note: Vertical Profiling Safeguards Drinking Water And Sheds Light On Cyanobacteria
    2/3/2011
    A search for algal toxins in North Carolina reservoirs has evolved into an ongoing early warning system for three important drinking water reservoirs—which serve two large cities—and yielded a greater understanding of the dynamics of blue-green algae, or cyanobacteria, in the state’s reservoir system. By YSI
  10. Disinfection By-Products (DBP) Precursor Monitoring
    2/1/2013

    Chlorine has long been used as a primary disinfection method for many water and wastewater treatment applications. However, there is growing concern about the harmful DBP’s produced by the use of chlorine.