WASTEWATER REGULATIONS AND LEGISLATION

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WASTEWATER PRODUCTS

CD225MV Wellpoint Contractor Dewatering Pump

CD225MV Wellpoint Contractor Dewatering Pump

The CD225MV is a portable wellpoint system designed for a wide range of on-site dewatering applications. The CD225MV offers flow rates up to 3100 gpm (196 l/sec.), total heads to 180 feet (54.9M), and can handle solids up to 3-1/8" (79mm) in diameter.

Flygt Probe

Flygt Probe

Flygt’s Probe is the most reliable and costeffective level sensor available in the water and wastewater industry today.

RecoPur® Produced Water Treatment Systems

RecoPur® Produced Water Treatment Systems

Eco-Tec is a globally recognized provider of produced-water treatment systems for heavy-oil operations, featuring advanced micro-media filtration (Spectrum™) and ion-exchange softeners (RecoPur®) that dramatically reduce materials, waste, and operational costs for clients.

Centrifugal; Submersible Chopper Pumps

Centrifugal; Submersible Chopper Pumps

Vaughan's submersible centrifugal chopper pumps have explosion proof motors...
Pumps - Air Diaphragm

Pumps - Air Diaphragm

Ideal Usage of Air Diaphragm Pumps: Sludge and slurries, flood control and dewatering situations associated with refineries. Applications where compressed air is available.

Aqua-Jet<sup>®</sup> SS-PW Aerator for Drinking Water Applications

Aqua-Jet® SS-PW Aerator for Drinking Water Applications

The Aqua-Jet® surface mechanical aerator, manufactured by Aqua-Aerobic Systems, has been approved by Underwriters Laboratory (UL) to meet ANSI/NSF STANDARD 61 requirements for use in potable water applications.

1700 Series For The Petro-Chemical Market

1700 Series For The Petro-Chemical Market

Mainsail Global’s Boone diffuser membranes are designed for the petro-chemical market with hydrogenated acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (HNBR). These custom membranes are built for durability, and can withstand long-term exposure to heat, oil and chemicals readily present in petro-chemical wastewater streams. With excellent tensile strength, abrasion and ozone resistance and higher modulus retention at elevated temperatures, Boone membranes combine the physical strength and chemical makeup of HNBR for an ideal solution in petro-chemical wastewater treatment.

Aqua-Aerobic® MBR

Aqua-Aerobic® MBR

The Aqua-Aerobic® MBR process specifically utilizes a unique time-managed, sequential aeration process to promote biological nutrient removal within a simplified unit process

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VIEWS ON THE LATEST REGULATIONS

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MORE WASTEWATER INDUSTRY FEATURES

  • In California, Come Rain Or Shine, Upfront Efficiency Is Always In Style
    In California, Come Rain Or Shine, Upfront Efficiency Is Always In Style

    Caught between a withering drought and floods from winter storms, California faces the worst of both worlds—dealing with scarcity as well as stormwater.  America, and much of the world, is watching to see how this trendsetting state handles those challenges.  After generations of setting America’s style, from cowboys to Beatniks to Beach Boys to Silicon Valley billionaires, California can set perhaps its most important trend yet—it can lead the way to a more water-efficient America.  It has to.  The good news is that it can.

  • Do You Know The Value Of Decentralized Infrastructure?
    Do You Know The Value Of Decentralized Infrastructure?

    According to the National Onsite Wastewater Recycling Association, onsite and decentralized wastewater treatment systems are an important part of a country’s permanent wastewater infrastructure. 

  • Cooling Water Intake Decisions Are Heating Up
    Cooling Water Intake Decisions Are Heating Up

    Now that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has issued its rule for cooling water intakes under Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act, the race is on for more than 600 power plants and manufacturing facilities to comply.  Right now, there is probably no better example in the water industry of how carefully choosing among compliance options can lead to millions of dollars in cost savings.

  • WWEMA Window: The Past, Present, And Future Of Water
    WWEMA Window: The Past, Present, And Future Of Water

    As I am writing this article, I find it hard to believe that another year has zipped by and evaluations of all our prognostications from the previous year are now subject to review and scrutiny.  2013 has been an interesting year in the water and wastewater market!

  • WWEMA Window: ‘Nondispersibles’ Turning Sewers Into Nightmares Nationwide
    WWEMA Window: ‘Nondispersibles’ Turning Sewers Into Nightmares Nationwide

    Increasingly, wipes are causing serious issues for wastewater treatment system operators. Many of the wipes entering the sewage system are not dispersible and technically not flushable.

  • Onsite Wastewater Treatment Technologies To Be Considered For Large And Small Projects
    Onsite Wastewater Treatment Technologies To Be Considered For Large And Small Projects

    There is a greater need to raise awareness for better sanitation, water reuse, and storm water solutions with better simple, low-cost, robust technology.

  • Endocrine Disrupting Compounds And Their Treatment
    Endocrine Disrupting Compounds And Their Treatment

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDC) are a subset of chemicals identified as contaminants of emerging concern, or “CECs.” EDCs are chemicals that can affect the endocrine (hormonal) systems of humans and animals. Hormones regulate reproduction, growth, and behavior. Anything that can potentially disrupt those functions must be studied carefully.

  • Howard County, Maryland Sets The Pace In Restoring Chesapeake Bay Ecosystem
    Howard County, Maryland Sets The Pace In Restoring Chesapeake Bay Ecosystem

    Howard County, Maryland, Bureau of Utilities recently completed the $92-million Addition No. 7 project at the Little Patuxent Water Reclamation Plant (LPWRP) to improve the quality of the plant’s effluent discharge and to reduce harmful nutrients reaching Chesapeake Bay. The project’s various increments took over five years to complete and incorporated innovative design solutions and state-of-the-art technologies for denitrification, aeration and disinfection. The project presents a model for Maryland’s 66 largest wastewater treatment plants and possibly procurement of municipal facilities elsewhere facing increasingly stringent regulatory changes.

  • WWEMA Window: Bridging The Optimization Gap
    WWEMA Window: Bridging The Optimization Gap

    The term “optimization” is becoming increasingly ubiquitous in our industry. Search almost any conference program, read through a trade journal, or sit in an annual planning meeting and you are likely to see or hear the word. However, as it gains popularity, optimization may be generating more questions than answers. Utilities often ask what optimization means and how to get started. For those that have already made changes, they may be asking if their utility is fully optimized.  By Kurt Tyler, Hach Company

  • Troubleshooting Nitrification And Denitrification In Wastewater
    Troubleshooting Nitrification And Denitrification In Wastewater

    The proper tools are essential to fixing any problem. Over the years, Ohio EPA’s Compliance Assistance Unit (CAU) has helped dozens of water resource recovery facilities (WRRF) get back into and maintain compliance with NPDES discharge permits. Their field toolkit has included an assortment of batch sampling kits and handheld instruments. Each tool had its place but each also had limitations and, as a result, the compliance puzzle often was missing important pieces. Increasingly, as nutrient limits were incorporated into discharge permits, the missing piece was characterizing the dynamics of nitrification and denitrification. By Patrick Higgins

  • Rethinking Old Standards:  A Few Small Changes Pave Way For Innovation
    Rethinking Old Standards: A Few Small Changes Pave Way For Innovation

    Innovation doesn’t necessarily require a brand new concept.

  • Triple Threat Creates A Tough Challenge For Pennsylvania Water Authority
    Triple Threat Creates A Tough Challenge For Pennsylvania Water Authority

    A well-known university, a busy main street, a 100-year-old pipeline and a tight deadline made for a tough challenge for crews attempting to install a 12-inch AMERICAN Fastite pipe in State College, Pennsylvania, this past summer.

  • A Smart Water Guide To Tackling The 5 Biggest Water Management Challenges
    A Smart Water Guide To Tackling The 5 Biggest Water Management Challenges

    For years, water utilities have expressed concerns about the five biggest pain points in water management:  leaks, non-revenue water, theft, poor customer service, and water and energy conservation. They know that addressing these pain points will help conserve water for future generations while also saving their customers money, but it isn’t always easy. By Dan Pinney, Director of AMI, Gas and Water, Sensus 

  • A New, Cost-Efficient Way To De-Sludge Your Lagoon
    A New, Cost-Efficient Way To De-Sludge Your Lagoon

    Most small towns, all over the world, utilize lagoons for treating their wastewater. Many rural industries also utilize lagoons for storm-water and wastewater treatment. While industrial plants may be able to pay for activated sludge treatment of one design or another, small municipalities simply do not have a choice in treating their small populations’ wastes. If the town’s population is not growing, the costs imposed for maintaining a wastewater plant are just not viable on a rural community’s, often, declining budget. The ongoing costs of trained personnel, electricity, and plant maintenance for a wastewater plant is just too high for communities with limited budgets. By Jim Dartez

  • Looming In The Sewers: Nonwovens Are Weaving A Tangled Web
    Looming In The Sewers: Nonwovens Are Weaving A Tangled Web

    Looming in the world’s sewer system are contaminants of emerging concern.  They’re not the endocrine disruptors, antibiotics or painkillers we’ve been reading about for the past several years (though those are indeed a challenge).  These contaminants are bigger, and like the legendary alligators rumored to lurk in the New York City sewer system when I was a kid, they are growing steadily, day by day, to pose a catastrophic threat.

  • Technical Experts Key To The Future Of Water
    Technical Experts Key To The Future Of Water

    Water is a complex, challenging field— a fact that should be better promoted if the industry wants to move forward, says Rich Lowrie, the water and wastewater industry manager with Krohne.

  • The Basics: Keeping Our Water Clean Requires Monitoring
    The Basics: Keeping Our Water Clean Requires Monitoring

    Keeping the water in our lakes, rivers, and streams clean requires monitoring of water quality at many points as it gradually makes its way from its source to our oceans. Over the years ever increasing environmental concerns and regulations have heightened the need for increased diligence and tighter restrictions on wastewater quality.

  • East Bay MUD Uses Custom Valve, Reduces Water Pressure And Gains Surge Protection
    East Bay MUD Uses Custom Valve, Reduces Water Pressure And Gains Surge Protection

    As an engineer, your day-to-day responsibilities often include staying up to date on best-in-class applications and specifications. But whether you’re charged with designing a water treatment facility or pump station, or simply supervising an existing system, the equipment you select must be vetted. This is generally a challenge for engineers because many companies are vying to have their products deemed as the best solution, yet visibility into those claims is often limited.

More From More Wastewater Industry Features