DRINKING WATER TREATMENT

Add Flow To Your Liquid Analysis With Advanced Analytical Instrumentation

Averting regulatory violations and fines. Avoiding system disruptions. Maintaining effective monitoring in complex applications. How do you tackle these kinds of age-old plant monitoring problems? 

DRINKING WATER TREATMENT CASE STUDIES AND WHITE PAPERS

  • White Paper: Impact Of HTA Dosing On Vent Stream Acidity Of An Acid Dosed MSF Plant As a part of the HTA dosing trial, a vent and distillate sampling system was designed to monitor acidity due to carbon dioxide in the MSF plant. This paper will discuss the results of the HTA dosing trial with respect to the effect on venting and corrosion.
  • Bubble Removal From Aqueous Streams Using SuperPhobic® Membrane Contactors
    Bubble Removal From Aqueous Streams Using SuperPhobic® Membrane Contactors

    Many manufacturing processes, analytical measurements, and other industrial processes and procedures that involve aqueous based solutions, are adversely affected by bubbles in the fluid stream.

  • Add Flow To Your Liquid Analysis With Advanced Analytical Instrumentation
    Add Flow To Your Liquid Analysis With Advanced Analytical Instrumentation

    Averting regulatory violations and fines. Avoiding system disruptions. Maintaining effective monitoring in complex applications. How do you tackle these kinds of age-old plant monitoring problems? 

  • Seawater Desalination At Rabigh Refinery Saudi Aramco’s RABIGH Refinery in Saudi Arabia wanted to install facility for 10000 TPD Seawater Desalination for the industrial use. The facility was supposed to be a BOOT (Build Own Operate Transfer) basis. By Aquatech International Corporation
  • Case Study: Optimized Quality Control In Mineral Water Plants
    Case Study: Optimized Quality Control In Mineral Water Plants Due to microbiological activity in the process, or to a lesser extent due to the reduction in nitrate levels in the raw water, nitrogen compounds may give rise to increased nitrite concentrations. By Endress + Hauser, Inc.
  • Monitor Your Pump For Process Efficiency
    Monitor Your Pump For Process Efficiency

    Pumps are all too frequently one of the most overlooked and abused pieces of equipment in process automation, yet nothing moves without them and a process becomes inefficient when they don’t operate properly or completely shutdown. By Jim Delee, Sr. Member Technical Staff, Fluid Components International

  • Project Profile: 750 GPM Iron & Manganese System, Meadow Lake MHC In February 2008 AdEdge Technologies, Inc. was selected as the sole vendor by Sun Communities, a nation wide owner and operator of Mobile Home Communities, to supply an iron and manganese treatment system, for the Meadow Lake MHC in White Lake, Michigan.
  • OSG- On-Site Sodium Hypochlorite (NaOCl) For Drinking Water Applications
    OSG- On-Site Sodium Hypochlorite (NaOCl) For Drinking Water Applications

    Drinking water treatment plants use various forms of chlorine to inactivate pathogens, oxidize metals or metalloids and provide disinfection residual for distribution systems. By Glen Smith, PEPCON Systems

  • How Larger Flow Meters Speak Volumes
    How Larger Flow Meters Speak Volumes

    As the price of water continues to increase, errors in flow measurement are magnified for distribution networks that transport large volumes of water. These systems often incorporate meters over 48 inches in diameter, which can be a challenge to calibrate. Learn how choosing the proper calibration method can ensure the most accurate measurements. By Richard Lowrie, Water and Wastwater Industry Specialist, KROHNE, Inc.

  • Case Study: Monitoring And Protecting Water Quality In Lake Mead, Nevada Lake Mead is one of several reservoirs along the Colorado River; however, due to increases in population and agricultural operations in recent decades, this once-expansive lake in the desert is becoming more compromised. While inflow into Lake Mead primarily is from the Colorado River, a small percent is also from rivers on the northern side of the Lake and from Las Vegas Wash on the northwest side. Las Vegas Wash transports treated municipal wastewater effluent, stormwater and urban runoff, and shallow groundwater seepage from the Las Vegas urban area to Boulder Basin in Lake Mead. Effluent flow rates have more than doubled in recent years, prompting concern over potential effects to reservoir water quality, especially since some of the water is pumped for the municipal water treatment plant at Saddle Island
More Drinking Water Treatment Case Studies and White Papers

DRINKING WATER TREATMENT APPLICATION NOTES

  • Miami Conservancy District Uses Nitrate Screening As Conjunctive Management Tool Tasked with monitoring a watershed covering nearly 4,000 square miles, almost 2,300 miles of rivers and streams, and a huge aquifer that provides drinking water for more than 1.2 million people, water quality monitoring specialists at the Miami Conservancy District (MCD) in Dayton, Ohio, have their hands full. By YSI
  • Application Bulletin: Reverse Osmosis
    Application Bulletin: Reverse Osmosis Osmosis is the phenomenon of lower dissolved solids in water passing through a semi-permeable membrane into higher dissolved solids water until a near equilibrium is reached
  • The Basics: Monitoring Deionized Water
    The Basics: Monitoring Deionized Water

    Years ago, high purity water was used only in limited applications. Today, deionized (Dl) water has become an essential ingredient in hundreds of applications including: medical, laboratory, pharmaceutical, cosmetics, electronics manufacturing, food processing, plating, countless industrial processes, and even the final rinse at the local car wash.

  • Immediate pH Correction For Fluctuating Flow
    Immediate pH Correction For Fluctuating Flow

    In a number of water, wastewater and industrial process applications, pH is one of the most critical and highly sensitive analytical measurements.  Examples of critical pH applications include: Reverse Osmosis (RO) systems in which a controlled feed of caustic solution is typically added to the feed stream in order to convert a portion of dissolved carbon dioxide into bicarbonate precipitate allowing for removal by the RO membrane. By Rafik H. Bishara, Steve Jacobs, and Dan Bell

  • The Basics: Keeping Our Water Clean Requires Monitoring
    The Basics: Keeping Our Water Clean Requires Monitoring

    Keeping the water in our lakes, rivers, and streams clean requires monitoring of water quality at many points as it gradually makes its way from its source to our oceans. Over the years ever increasing environmental concerns and regulations have heightened the need for increased diligence and tighter restrictions on wastewater quality.

  • Application Note: Vertical Profiling Safeguards Drinking Water And Sheds Light On Cyanobacteria A search for algal toxins in North Carolina reservoirs has evolved into an ongoing early warning system for three important drinking water reservoirs—which serve two large cities—and yielded a greater understanding of the dynamics of blue-green algae, or cyanobacteria, in the state’s reservoir system. By YSI
  • Removal Of DBPs With Activated Carbon
    Removal Of DBPs With Activated Carbon

    In order to reduce the formation of harmful disinfection byproducts in drinking water, alternative disinfectant use has become increasingly widespread. Monochloramine is a leading alternative disinfectant that offers advantages for municipal water. This tech brief details the removal of monochloramine using activated carbon.

  • Dissolved Oxygen Measurement
    Dissolved Oxygen Measurement

    One of the most important measurements in the determination of the health of a body of water is its dissolved oxygen content. The quantity of dissolved oxygen in water is normally expressed in parts per million (ppm) by weight and is due to the solubility of oxygen from the atmosphere around us.

  • Using Real-Time Telemetry For Ecological Monitoring Of Coastal Wetlands The Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR)in Mississippi is one of 27 protected estuarine reserves across the United States. By YSI
  • Defining Drinking Water Plant Backwash Profile Using The SOLITAX™ Sc Suspended Solids And Turbidity Sensor
    Defining Drinking Water Plant Backwash Profile Using The SOLITAX™ Sc Suspended Solids And Turbidity Sensor

    Today’s drinking water plants have many challenges to meet as they produce water for a fast-growing and increasingly demanding population.

More Drinking Water Treatment Application Notes

DRINKING WATER TREATMENT PRODUCTS

Johnson Screens® Passive Intake Screens

Johnson Screens® Passive Intake Screens

Bilfinger Water Technologies’ brand of Johnson Screens® passive intake screen system provides uninterrupted water withdrawal from lakes, rivers and oceans. The Johnson Screens® passive intake screen operates continuously and requires no downtime for cleaning or routine maintenance. Moreover, the system can be configured to meet US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) regulations for protecting aquatic life.

Omni-SORB™ IRS Series Standard Fe/Mn Removal Filtration System

Omni-SORB™ IRS Series Standard Fe/Mn Removal Filtration System

Severn Trent Services offers the Omni-SORB™ IRS, a standard preengineered product line of filter systems for the combined removal of oxidized iron and manganese from potable ground water sources. Omni SORB IRS systems are also used for the removal of arsenic in the presence of high iron waters.
Filtration: Filtomat M100 Series -- Pistonless Model

Filtration: Filtomat M100 Series -- Pistonless Model

Water is filtered through the fine screen to the outlet. The filtration cake is accumulated on the inner surface of the fine screen causing pressure differential to build up
AquaCarb® CX Series Enhanced Coconut Shell-based Activated Carbon

AquaCarb® CX Series Enhanced Coconut Shell-based Activated Carbon

AquaCarb® CX series carbons from Evoqua, are a coconut shell-based activated carbon that includes both a high micropore and mesopore volume making this an excellent alternative to coal-based activated carbon for surface water treatment.

Sentinel® 12

Sentinel® 12

Designed to treat flows up to 4.8 million gallons per day (15 MLD), the SENTINEL 12 can effectively disinfect drinking water in small- to medium-sized treatment plants.
Aztec 600 Phosphate Analyzer

Aztec 600 Phosphate Analyzer

The Aztec 600 Phosphate Analyzer AW636 has been designed specifically for the measurement of phosphate in both potable water and municipal wastewater effluents. It offers reliable and accurate on-line analysis of phosphate up to 50 ppm PO4.
More Drinking Water Treatment Products
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LATEST INSIGHTS ON DRINKING WATER TREATMENT

  • Decrease Membrane Treatment Capital And O&M Costs With Optimum Flux Rates
    Decrease Membrane Treatment Capital And O&M Costs With Optimum Flux Rates

    Despite a global effort to standardize units of measure to the metric system, the water treatment industry still follows the U.S. trend in resisting that directive by referring to water volumes in treatment plants as gallons per day (GPD).  While achieving a specified permeate GPD is certainly important in overall membrane plant design, production capacity has absolutely nothing to do with determining optimal methods of treating site-specific feedwaters and offers no indication of potential membrane fouling rates and related maintenance costs. To evaluate these factors, knowledgeable professionals rely on membrane flux rates as the key consideration in achieving optimal system design and operation. By Harold G. Fravel Jr., Executive Director, American Membrane Technology Association and Karen Lindsey, VP, Avista Technologies, Inc.

  • The UV Uprising: How UV Disinfection Will Claw Its Way To Prominence
    The UV Uprising: How UV Disinfection Will Claw Its Way To Prominence

    Chlorination in all of its forms — gas, liquid, or solid — has been the primary way for treatment plants to disinfect the treated wastewater. The treatment plants that use gas chlorination must face federal regulatory oversight in the form of a Risk Management Program (RMP). Liquid chlorine plants trade in the regulatory oversight for a more expensive and less effective product. While chlorine in its solid form is good for small treatment facilities known as package plants (named for their mobility). However, ultraviolet (UV) technology is rapidly altering the landscape of disinfection throughout the industry. By Sheldon Primus, MPA, COSS

  • Has Fracking Gone ‘Green’?
    Has Fracking Gone ‘Green’?

    There are few topics more controversial these days than hydraulic fracturing ("fracking"). While the debate rages on as to whether fracking poses a risk to water quality, a new desalination technique addresses two other environmental concerns: water scarcity and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Developed by researchers at the University of British Columbia (UBC), the breakthrough technology uses excess carbon dioxide created in the fracking process to desalinate the process water, making it available for water reuse. It also generates chemicals — hydrochloric acid and carbonate salts — that are valuable for many industrial applications.

  • Integrated Smart Device Technologies: The Road To Smart City Infrastructure
    Integrated Smart Device Technologies: The Road To Smart City Infrastructure

    Phones have now become smart phones, water has become smart water, and cities are now trending towards becoming smart cities, but what does all this mean and how do we effectively make our water infrastructure smarter?

  • Next-Generation Arsenic Removal
    Next-Generation Arsenic Removal

    A novel process gives spent adsorptive media — and utilities’ budgets — new life.

  • Disinfection Byproducts: Treatment Options And Challenges For Public Water Suppliers
    Disinfection Byproducts: Treatment Options And Challenges For Public Water Suppliers

    Regulated and emerging disinfection byproducts (DBPs) pose several challenges for water suppliers, but there is a variety of cost-effective cures.

More Drinking Water Treatment Insights

DRINKING WATER TREATMENT VIDEOS

Video: Hanna Instruments 98703 Portable Turbidity Meter

Video: Hanna Instruments 98703 Portable Turbidity Meter

The Hanna Instruments 98703 portable turbidity meter is perfect for stormwater testing.

Low Flow Sampling Using A TROLL® 9500 Water Quality Instrument

The TROLL® 9500 Water Quality Instrument simplifies multiparameter monitoring. The TROLL 9500 is a powerful, portable unit that houses up to nine water quality sensors, internal power, and optional data logging capabilities.

Video: TETRA® Filtration Systems

Video: TETRA® Filtration Systems

Download this video to learn more about Severn Trent Services' award-winning TETRA DeepBed wastewater filtration technology.
Video: YSI Professional Plus Multiparameter Meter

Video: YSI Professional Plus Multiparameter Meter

This video gives an overview of the features and benefits of the YSI Professional Plus, or Pro Plus, handheld multiparameter water quality instrument.
The New IQ SensorNet Product Video

The New IQ SensorNet Product Video

The IQ SensorNet wastewater treatment process monitor is a powerful, modular system designed to be flexible enough to place anywhere in your wastewater treatment system and add to it at anytime.

More From Drinking Water Treatment Videos

ABOUT DRINKING WATER TREATMENT

Drinking Water Treatment involves the removal of pathogens and other contaminants from source water in order to make it safe for humans to consume. Treatment of public drinking water is mandated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the U.S. Common examples of contaminants that need to be treated and removed from water before it is considered potable are microorganisms, disinfectants, disinfection byproducts, inorganic chemicals, organic chemicals and radionuclides.

There are a variety of technologies and processes that can be used to decontaminate or treat water in a drinking water treatment plant before the clean water is pumped into the water distribution system for consumption.

The first stage in treating drinking water is often called pretreatment and involves screens to remove large debris and objects from the water supply. Aeration can also be used in the pretreatment phase. By mixing air and water, unwanted gases and minerals are removed and the water improves in color, taste and odor.

The second stage in the drinking water treatment process involves coagulation and flocculation. A coagulating agent is added to the water which causes suspended particles to stick together into clumps of material called floc. In sedimentation basins, the heavier floc separates from the water supply and sinks to form sludge, allowing the less turbid water to continue through the process.

During the filtration stage, smaller particles not removed by flocculation are removed from the treated water by running the water through a series of filters. Filter media can include sand, granulated carbon or manufactured membranes. Filtration using reverse osmosis membranes is a critical component of removing salt particles where desalination is being used to treat brackish water or seawater into drinking water.

Following filtration, the water is disinfected to kill or disable any microbes or viruses that could make the consumer sick. The most traditional disinfection method for treating drinking water uses chlorine or chloramines. However, new drinking water disinfection methods are constantly coming to market. Two disinfection methods that have been gaining traction use ozone and ultra-violet (UV) light to disinfect the water supply.