DRINKING WATER

Chicago Suburb Ensures Highest Water Quality Year-Round, Saves On Labor And Reagents With New Chlorine Analyzers

For the Village of Lombard’s Water Division, consistently delivering high-quality tap water to the community’s nearly 44,000 residents and the businesses serving them was once quite a juggling act: constantly fixing old, temperamental analyzers; feeding reagents into the old analyzers; and staying ahead of callers complaining about “musty” water tastes and odors. Not today.

DRINKING WATER CASE STUDIES AND WHITE PAPERS

  • Water Supplier Ensures DBP Compliance With UV254 Organic Monitoring Mohawk Valley Water Authority (MVWA) is a progressive supplier of potable water. With source water from the Adirondack Mountains, MVWA works to improve on nature and provide superior water quality, always striving to meet or exceed drinking water standards. Like many other surface water sources, MVWA’s water supply is rich with natural organic matter (NOM). Unfortunately, growing research has demonstrated that NOM in water when combined with chlorine leads to the formation of potentially harmful disinfection by-products. By Jodi Glover, Real Tech Inc.
  • Generating Station Maximizes Efficiency By Choosing A Membrane Decarbonation System
    Generating Station Maximizes Efficiency By Choosing A Membrane Decarbonation System

    When dissolved carbon dioxide in the water began overloading the anion resin and decreasing capacity at its Rokeby Generating Station, Lincoln Electric Systems had to act quickly to update its winter contingency plans and meet increasing demand. In this case study, learn why the municipality chose a membrane degasifying system over chemical treatment options or a forced draft aerator, thus reducing costs and improving overall efficiency by minimizing downtime.

  • Poison In The Water: How To Defeat Toxic Algae
    Poison In The Water: How To Defeat Toxic Algae

    Like many municipalities, Hamilton, Ontario, is wary of harmful algal blooms and toxic cyanobacteria. To mitigate the threat and protect drinking water, a proactive, risk-based plan was developed.

  • The Next Frontier: Automating By Water Quality Since the early 1970s, water and wastewater plants have been automating processes in order to achieve a more stable effluent and to decrease costs. By Bob Dabkowski, Hach Company
  • Using Virtual Reference Grounding For Electromagnetic Flowmeters

    Electromagnetic flowmeters (EMFs) are the leading choice for recording the volume flow of electrically conductive liquids in a wide range of industries, including chemical, pharmaceutical, water/wastewater and food. By Ralf Haut, KROHNE, Inc.

  • Biothane Delivers Anaerobic Wastewater Treatment To Veryfine Products
    Biothane Delivers Anaerobic Wastewater Treatment To Veryfine Products

    Biothane’s turnkey project was designed to treat wastewater by providing a series of treatment processes. Pre-treatment consists of a bar screen, influent sump, grit removal and rotary screen to remove debris from the influent stream.

  • Triple Threat Creates A Tough Challenge For Pennsylvania Water Authority
    Triple Threat Creates A Tough Challenge For Pennsylvania Water Authority

    A well-known university, a busy main street, a 100-year-old pipeline and a tight deadline made for a tough challenge for crews attempting to install a 12-inch AMERICAN Fastite pipe in State College, Pennsylvania, this past summer.

  • China Power Plant Reduces Capital Costs, Energy Use With New Integrated Membrane System
    China Power Plant Reduces Capital Costs, Energy Use With New Integrated Membrane System

    As engineers come under increasing pressure to reduce maintenance and operating costs, inefficient combination double-pass reverse osmosis and electrodeionization (RO/EDI) water treatment systems have begun to lose popularity as a means of providing ultra-pure water. Integrated membrane systems (IMS), on the other hand, combine multiple membrane-based water treatment processes into a single system. In this case study, find out how a heat and power plant in Northeast China lowered capital costs and energy use by adopting an IMS to replace its conventional water treatment system.

  • Water Treatment Plant Solves Taste And Odor Problems And High Toxin Levels
    Water Treatment Plant Solves Taste And Odor Problems And High Toxin Levels

    Phoenix is one of the country’s fastest growing metropolitan areas and has one of the most arid desert climates. Population growth coupled with increasingly stringent water regulations pushed the city to proactively address future water supply concerns. The decision was made to build the Lake Pleasant Water Treatment Plant (WTP) and include oxidation and disinfection treatment barriers.

  • The Highs And Lows Of Flow Measurement
    The Highs And Lows Of Flow Measurement

    In Feb. 2014, the Federal Bureau of Reclamation informed central California farmers that they would receive no irrigation water from the lakes, canals, and reservoirs under the Bureau’s control due to severe drought conditions. During the previous year, the farmers were only given 20 percent of their normal allocation of water.  California officials who oversee the state’s water holdings also released information that no water will be available to the farmers for irrigation. Residential users also saw severe cuts. By Rich Lowrie, Water and Wastewater Industry Manager, KROHNE, Inc.

More Drinking Water Case Studies and White Papers

DRINKING WATER APPLICATION NOTES

  • Application Note: Water Flows From The Golden Hills Of California Each morning John Johnson drives the few miles from his smalltown home in northern California to the Center at Pardee Reservoir. Nestled among the foothills of the Sierra Nevada mountain range, the reservoir is a long 100 miles away from San Francisco Bay. By YSI
  • Determination Of Hexanal In Foods Utilizing Dynamic Headspace

    Hexanal is one of many well-documented aromatic components that contribute to flavor and aroma in common consumer food products containing omega-6 fatty acids. Hexanal content is also used to measure the oxidative status of foods rich in omega-6 fatty acids.

  • Bringing Efficiency And New Confidence To BOD₅ Analysis

    Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) analysis is the test everyone loves to hate—and for compelling reasons.

  • Phosphate Corrosion Control In Drinking Water

    Corrosion occurs because metals tend to oxidize when they come in contact with oxygenated water, resulting in the formation of stable metal oxides.

  • Monitoring Aromatic Organics For Optimizing Coagulation

    With the increasing awareness about the negative effects of organics within the water and wastewater treatment process along with increasingly strict water quality regulations, the need for more effective organics removal is becoming more important.

  • Application Note: YSI Real-Time Water Quality Monitoring And The IPSWATCH-EMPACT Program The Ipswich and Parker Rivers watersheds lie only a short distance north of Boston, MA. The first settlements in these watersheds began in the early 1600s. Since that time, residents have relied heavily on the natural resources of the Parker and Ipswich Rivers, their coastal estuaries and Plum Island Sound, which is known as the Great Marsh. This ecosystem has been designated and protected by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as an Area of Critical Environmental Concern (ACEC).
  • Dissolved Oxygen Measurement

    One of the most important measurements in the determination of the health of a body of water is its dissolved oxygen content. The quantity of dissolved oxygen in water is normally expressed in parts per million (ppm) by weight and is due to the solubility of oxygen from the atmosphere around us.

  • Water Distribution System Wireless Monitoring Application Note

    Providing water distribution monitoring solutions since 1987, Telog continues to offer the industry’s leading remote data acquisition system including the most comprehensive family of battery powered, environmentally rugged wireless monitors available from any single supplier.

  • Determination Of Pesticide Residues In Honey, By An Automated QuEChERS Solution

    The QuEChERS (Quick-Easy-Cheap-Effective-Rugged-Safe) sample extraction method was developed for the determination of pesticide residues in agricultural commodities.

  • Measuring The Chlorine Content In The Emergency Chlorination Of Waterworks Many municipal waterworks perform no permanent disinfection of drinking water. However, in many cases a process known as emergency chlorination takes place. The process is switched on in case of need, adding chlorine to the drinking water as a disinfectant.
More Drinking Water Application Notes

DRINKING WATER PRODUCTS

OPUS® II Technology - a New Innovation for High Recovery of Water for Reuse

OPUS® II Technology - a New Innovation for High Recovery of Water for Reuse

OPUS® II is a proprietary process for high recovery of complex wastewater streams. This new innovation uses CeraMem® ceramic membranes as pretreatment for reverse osmosis to reduce the system footprint. OPUS II can be delivered in modular, containerized units to minimize installation costs.

Like the original OPUS technology, OPUS II effectively removes silica, organics, hardness, boron, strontium and particulates. It generates high quality effluent at a high recovery rate, providing clean water for discharge, recycle or reuse.

Leopold® Clari-DAF® MP System

Leopold® Clari-DAF® MP System

The Leopold® Clari-DAF® MP (Membrane Pretreatment) system is ideal as a clarification technology for potable water treatment systems using membrane filtration.
Instrumentation: OPTIFLEX Guided Radar Level

Instrumentation: OPTIFLEX Guided Radar Level

Guided Radar (TDR) Level Meter for distance, level and volume of liquids, liquid interface, pastes and solids
Drinking Water Packaged Systems

Drinking Water Packaged Systems

Degremont offers a complete range of treatment capabilities in a compact package plant.

Desalination Of Sea Water

Desalination Of Sea Water

Desalination is the name given to processes that remove salt from water
Brands You Know. Performance You Trust

Brands You Know. Performance You Trust

While the Evoqua name is new, the brands you know and the performance you trust are not. Evoqua continues a 100-year tradition of helping consulting engineers and municipalities respond to market needs and evolving water standards for new plants, upgrades and retrofits.

More Products
Newsletter Signup
Newsletter Signup
By clicking Sign Me Up, you agree to our Terms and that you have read our Privacy Policy.

LATEST INSIGHTS ON DRINKING WATER

More Drinking Water Features

DRINKING WATER VIDEOS

Low Flow Sampling Using A TROLL® 9500 Water Quality Instrument

The TROLL® 9500 Water Quality Instrument simplifies multiparameter monitoring. The TROLL 9500 is a powerful, portable unit that houses up to nine water quality sensors, internal power, and optional data logging capabilities.

Video: UAT™ Membrane Filtration Systems

Video: UAT™ Membrane Filtration Systems

Using high quality components, the skid-mounted UAT systems are engineered to effectively produce treated water, free of particulate matter or contaminants
The House On Wade Avenue

The House On Wade Avenue

In Raleigh, N.C., there's a house... or what looks like a house. What's hidden inside is more important than most people realize.

NASA: Megadroughts Projected For American West

NASA scientists used tree rings to understand past droughts and climate models incorporating soil moisture data to estimate future drought risk in the 21st century.

Drought Forum Webinar: The Growing Demand For Re-Used And Brackish Water

The Western Governors' Drought Forum webinar “Once Marginal, Now Crucial: The Growing Demand for Re-used, Produced, and Brackish Water” explores the technological and regulatory obstacles to utilizing re-used, produced, and brackish water.

More Drinking Water Videos

ABOUT DRINKING WATER

In most developed countries, drinking water is regulated to ensure that it meets drinking water quality standards. In the U.S., the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administers these standards under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA)

Drinking water considerations can be divided into three core areas of concern:

  1. Source water for a community’s drinking water supply
  2. Drinking water treatment of source water
  3. Distribution of treated drinking water to consumers

Drinking Water Sources

Source water access is imperative to human survival. Sources may include groundwater from aquifers, surface water from rivers and streams and seawater through a desalination process. Direct or indirect water reuse is also growing in popularity in communities with limited access to sources of traditional surface or groundwater. 

Source water scarcity is a growing concern as populations grow and move to warmer, less aqueous climates; climatic changes take place and industrial and agricultural processes compete with the public’s need for water. The scarcity of water supply and water conservation are major focuses of the American Water Works Association.

Drinking Water Treatment

Drinking Water Treatment involves the removal of pathogens and other contaminants from source water in order to make it safe for humans to consume. Treatment of public drinking water is mandated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the U.S. Common examples of contaminants that need to be treated and removed from water before it is considered potable are microorganisms, disinfectants, disinfection byproducts, inorganic chemicals, organic chemicals and radionuclides.

There are a variety of technologies and processes that can be used for contaminant removal and the removal of pathogens to decontaminate or treat water in a drinking water treatment plant before the clean water is pumped into the water distribution system for consumption.

The first stage in treating drinking water is often called pretreatment and involves screens to remove large debris and objects from the water supply. Aeration can also be used in the pretreatment phase. By mixing air and water, unwanted gases and minerals are removed and the water improves in color, taste and odor.

The second stage in the drinking water treatment process involves coagulation and flocculation. A coagulating agent is added to the water which causes suspended particles to stick together into clumps of material called floc. In sedimentation basins, the heavier floc separates from the water supply and sinks to form sludge, allowing the less turbid water to continue through the process.

During the filtration stage, smaller particles not removed by flocculation are removed from the treated water by running the water through a series of filters. Filter media can include sand, granulated carbon or manufactured membranes. Filtration using reverse osmosis membranes is a critical component of removing salt particles where desalination is being used to treat brackish water or seawater into drinking water.

Following filtration, the water is disinfected to kill or disable any microbes or viruses that could make the consumer sick. The most traditional disinfection method for treating drinking water uses chlorine or chloramines. However, new drinking water disinfection methods are constantly coming to market. Two disinfection methods that have been gaining traction use ozone and ultra-violet (UV) light to disinfect the water supply.

Drinking Water Distribution

Drinking water distribution involves the management of flow of the treated water to the consumer. By some estimates, up to 30% of treated water fails to reach the consumer. This water, often called non-revenue water, escapes from the distribution system through leaks in pipelines and joints, and in extreme cases through water main breaks.

A public water authority manages drinking water distribution through a network of pipes, pumps and valves and monitors that flow using flow, level and pressure measurement sensors and equipment.

Water meters and metering systems such as automatic meter reading (AMR) and advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) allows a water utility to assess a consumer’s water use and charge them for the correct amount of water they have consumed.