DRINKING WATER

Monoclor Chloramine Residual Management System Manages Residual For Problematic 5.5 Million Gallon Tank
Monoclor Chloramine Residual Management System Manages Residual For Problematic 5.5 Million Gallon Tank

Eastern Municipal Water District (EMWD) serves about 142,000 customers in Riverside County, CA. The EMWD service area is one of the largest for any water district in arid southern California. On the drinking water side, EMWD manages two water treatment plants and over 15 reservoirs. With 70% of the district’s water coming from the Metropolitan Water District with chloramine disinfection, EMWD has become reliant on chloramine disinfection to manage long transmission lines and longer detention times.

DRINKING WATER CASE STUDIES AND WHITE PAPERS

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DRINKING WATER APPLICATION NOTES

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DRINKING WATER PRODUCTS

HQd Digital Benchtop Meters And IntelliCAL™ Probes HQd Digital Benchtop Meters And IntelliCAL™ Probes

Hach, the leader in water quality, has developed a customized solution for water quality testing that takes the guesswork out of your measurements.

OPTISOUND VU31 OPTISOUND VU31
The 2-Channel Optisound-VU31, available with analog inputs and 6 SPDT relays, can be used in a variety of Level and Open Channel Flow applications.
Xylem’s Leopold Oxelia™ for Drinking Water Applications Xylem’s Leopold Oxelia™ for Drinking Water Applications

Biological and chemical contamination in drinking water poses a significant public health risk and plant operators require a treatment system that allows them to produce a safe and reliable supply of clear, good-tasting and biologically-stable finished water with the lowest concentrations of non-desired substances.

WEDECO Spektron e UV Series By Xylem WEDECO Spektron e UV Series By Xylem

The WEDECO Spektron series shines new light on the environmentally friendly process of using UV disinfection for drinking water. Featuring highly efficient ECORAY® UV lamp technology and advanced flow distribution, the Spektron series suits modern drinking water treatment plants, regardless of local pipe conditions, energy costs or local legal requirements.

H2Zero Backwash Recycle Systems H2Zero Backwash Recycle Systems

The H2Zero Backwash Recycle Systems configuration can be designed for arsenic adsorption or iron & manganese oxidation & filtration systems. Whether backwashing is infrequent (every 45-60 days in the case of adsorption for "fluffing" the media beds or performed one or more times per week using AdEdge can customize a solution to fit your need.

Process Instrumentation And Analytics Solutions For Water And Wastewater Process Instrumentation And Analytics Solutions For Water And Wastewater

Supplying drinking water to the population and treating wastewater are two very important global challenges. On a daily basis, system planners, designers and operators are required to keep the global increase in water consumption under control in the face of growing water shortages and the salination of fresh water resources. As industry experts for water applications, we offer powerful, innovative technical solutions to assist you.

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LATEST INSIGHTS ON DRINKING WATER

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DRINKING WATER VIDEOS

EPWU's Advanced Water Purification Project

During the summer months, El Paso experiences a spike in water demand increasing the dependency on river water. But what happens if there is little or no river water?

EPA Administrator Speaks At 40th Anniversary Of Safe Drinking Water Act

EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy speaks at the 40th Anniversary of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) on December 9, 2014 at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C.

Earth Day Outreach: Insights On Water Conservation And Quality Earth Day Outreach: Insights On Water Conservation And Quality

"Wastewater Dan” talks with FOX 4 News Kansas City about drought conditions in California and procedures to conserve water in the home. He also demonstrates the use of a total dissolved solids (TDS) meter to test drinking water quality, and interprets the results.

WRF Direct Potable Reuse Research Projects

Water Research Foundation at the Silicon Valley Advanced Water Purification Center talking with Jim Fiedler and Andrew Salveson about upcoming WRF Direct Potable Reuse research projects.

Lead Poisioning Disaster: How To Fix It

Lead poisoning water service lines are turning up around the globe at an alarming rate leaving millions angry. ePIPE's innovative technology creates a new pipe barrier inside the service lines eliminating water contact with the lead service lines.

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ABOUT DRINKING WATER

In most developed countries, drinking water is regulated to ensure that it meets drinking water quality standards. In the U.S., the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administers these standards under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA)

Drinking water considerations can be divided into three core areas of concern:

  1. Source water for a community’s drinking water supply
  2. Drinking water treatment of source water
  3. Distribution of treated drinking water to consumers

Drinking Water Sources

Source water access is imperative to human survival. Sources may include groundwater from aquifers, surface water from rivers and streams and seawater through a desalination process. Direct or indirect water reuse is also growing in popularity in communities with limited access to sources of traditional surface or groundwater. 

Source water scarcity is a growing concern as populations grow and move to warmer, less aqueous climates; climatic changes take place and industrial and agricultural processes compete with the public’s need for water. The scarcity of water supply and water conservation are major focuses of the American Water Works Association.

Drinking Water Treatment

Drinking Water Treatment involves the removal of pathogens and other contaminants from source water in order to make it safe for humans to consume. Treatment of public drinking water is mandated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the U.S. Common examples of contaminants that need to be treated and removed from water before it is considered potable are microorganisms, disinfectants, disinfection byproducts, inorganic chemicals, organic chemicals and radionuclides.

There are a variety of technologies and processes that can be used for contaminant removal and the removal of pathogens to decontaminate or treat water in a drinking water treatment plant before the clean water is pumped into the water distribution system for consumption.

The first stage in treating drinking water is often called pretreatment and involves screens to remove large debris and objects from the water supply. Aeration can also be used in the pretreatment phase. By mixing air and water, unwanted gases and minerals are removed and the water improves in color, taste and odor.

The second stage in the drinking water treatment process involves coagulation and flocculation. A coagulating agent is added to the water which causes suspended particles to stick together into clumps of material called floc. In sedimentation basins, the heavier floc separates from the water supply and sinks to form sludge, allowing the less turbid water to continue through the process.

During the filtration stage, smaller particles not removed by flocculation are removed from the treated water by running the water through a series of filters. Filter media can include sand, granulated carbon or manufactured membranes. Filtration using reverse osmosis membranes is a critical component of removing salt particles where desalination is being used to treat brackish water or seawater into drinking water.

Following filtration, the water is disinfected to kill or disable any microbes or viruses that could make the consumer sick. The most traditional disinfection method for treating drinking water uses chlorine or chloramines. However, new drinking water disinfection methods are constantly coming to market. Two disinfection methods that have been gaining traction use ozone and ultra-violet (UV) light to disinfect the water supply.

Drinking Water Distribution

Drinking water distribution involves the management of flow of the treated water to the consumer. By some estimates, up to 30% of treated water fails to reach the consumer. This water, often called non-revenue water, escapes from the distribution system through leaks in pipelines and joints, and in extreme cases through water main breaks.

A public water authority manages drinking water distribution through a network of pipes, pumps and valves and monitors that flow using flow, level and pressure measurement sensors and equipment.

Water meters and metering systems such as automatic meter reading (AMR) and advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) allows a water utility to assess a consumer’s water use and charge them for the correct amount of water they have consumed.