DRINKING WATER

If You Can't Measure It, You Can’t Fix It

Harnessing Aclara Advanced Analytics for Water Balancing, Meter Trending and Meter Right-Sizing Water utility managers today face a conundrum. 

DRINKING WATER CASE STUDIES AND WHITE PAPERS

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DRINKING WATER APPLICATION NOTES

  • Application Note: Employing Best Water Quality Monitoring Practices To Reduce Runoff During Construction Under proposed EPA stormwater runoff guidelines, construction site operators will be required to actively monitor or sample stormwater discharges daily. The enhanced effluent rules take effect in August 2011 for construction sites that disturb 20 or more acres and February 2014 for sites that disturb 10 or more acres, and they may stipulate a strict numerical limit of less than 280 NTU for average turbidity (sediment in water) on any day. By YSI
  • Application Note: YSI Real-Time Water Quality Monitoring And The IPSWATCH-EMPACT Program The Ipswich and Parker Rivers watersheds lie only a short distance north of Boston, MA. The first settlements in these watersheds began in the early 1600s. Since that time, residents have relied heavily on the natural resources of the Parker and Ipswich Rivers, their coastal estuaries and Plum Island Sound, which is known as the Great Marsh. This ecosystem has been designated and protected by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as an Area of Critical Environmental Concern (ACEC).
  • Hach FilterTrak 660™ Sc Laser Nephelometer Even More Practical For Ultra-Low Turbidity Monitoring

    Now compatible with the Hach sc100 Controller, the FilterTrak 660 sc Nephelometer connects as a ‘plug and play’ sensor with the universal, dualchannel controller that features an inherent power supply.

  • Application Note: Continuous Monitoring Of Drinking Water Provides Assurance Of Safety A water utility in Ohio wanted to learn more about the variability of water quality parameters such as pH, ORP, turbidity, and chlorine. Previously, most of these parameters had been measured by spot sampling protocols with only a few measurements during a daily period. In order to more accurately assess the water variability, the utility used a YSI 6920DW Drinking Water Multiprobe
  • Desalination Plants: YSI Instruments Monitor Flow & Water Quality At Multiple Stages Desalination is the process of removing salt from sea water or brackish river or groundwater to make potable water. By YSI
  • Miami Conservancy District Uses Nitrate Screening As Conjunctive Management Tool Tasked with monitoring a watershed covering nearly 4,000 square miles, almost 2,300 miles of rivers and streams, and a huge aquifer that provides drinking water for more than 1.2 million people, water quality monitoring specialists at the Miami Conservancy District (MCD) in Dayton, Ohio, have their hands full. By YSI
  • Application Note: Ozone Measurement In Potable Water Ozone is a powerful oxidizing agent that can be used to destroy the organic compounds that affect the taste and odor of potable water. Environmental concerns have led to increased use of ozone because, unlike chlorine, it does not form hazardous by-products. By Emerson Process Management, Rosemount Analytical
  • Disinfection By-Products (DBP) Precursor Monitoring

    Chlorine has long been used as a primary disinfection method for many water and wastewater treatment applications. However, there is growing concern about the harmful DBP’s produced by the use of chlorine.

  • Ion Exchange Resins And Activated Carbons For Better-Tasting Water

    For many, access to good-tasting tap water is limited, and buying bottled water can be expensive. Simple pour-through jug filters offer a low-cost and effective alternative. Activated carbons, in conjunction with ion exchange products, produce drinking water that is absent of all industrial pesticides and contaminants.

  • Ozone Disinfection: Ozone Measurement In Potable Water Ozone is a powerful oxidizing agent that can be used to destroy the organic compounds that affect the taste and odor of potable water. Environmental concerns have led to increased use of ozone because, unlike chlorine, it does not form hazardous by-products. By Emerson Process Management, Rosemount Analytical
More Drinking Water Application Notes

DRINKING WATER PRODUCTS

TruLab pH 1110 Laboratory Benchtop Meter

TruLab pH 1110 Laboratory Benchtop Meter

The YSI TruLab® line includes the 1110 (single channel), 1310 and 1310P (single channel) and 1320 and 1320P (dual channel) instruments providing easy-to-use and calibrate instruments ideal for the laboratory.

Sentinel® 18

Sentinel® 18

Designed to treat flows up to 10 million gallons per day (38 MLD), the Sentinel 18 can effectively disinfect drinking water in small- to medium-sized treatment plants.
Discfilter Filtration System

Discfilter Filtration System

Discfilters are an ideal filtration system for tertiary filtration and wastewater reuse. By employing woven cloth filter elements installed vertically on multiple discs, the Discfilter supplies a large filter area within a small footprint that is up to 75% smaller than a traditional sand or multimedia filter which means a lower total installed cost.
Duplex Gravity Filter (DGF)

Duplex Gravity Filter (DGF)

The Smith & Loveless Duplex Gravity Filter (DGF) removes suspended solids and particles, improving effluent quality. The standard system is available in sizes to fit any application, providing up to 200 square feet (18.6 square meters) of effective filtration area per unit. Dual media filtration increases filtration depth and limits the head loss problems associated with single-media designs.

Vaccuperm Chlorine Disinfection Systems

Vaccuperm Chlorine Disinfection Systems

Measure & control your chlorine gas dosing with absolute dependability – our full vacuum systems ensure process reliability.
ReFleX™ Efficiency

ReFleX™ Efficiency

For both disinfection and TOC-reduction applications, NeoTech Aqua Solutions’ patented ReFleX™ UV chamber technology represents the state-of-the-art in high-efficiency UV systems by reflecting over 99% of the UV we generate back into the water.

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LATEST INSIGHTS ON DRINKING WATER

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DRINKING WATER VIDEOS

Low Flow Sampling Using A TROLL® 9500 Water Quality Instrument

The TROLL® 9500 Water Quality Instrument simplifies multiparameter monitoring. The TROLL 9500 is a powerful, portable unit that houses up to nine water quality sensors, internal power, and optional data logging capabilities.

The YSI Pro2030 Handheld Conductivity And DO Meter Video

The YSI Pro2030 Handheld Conductivity And DO Meter Video

The YSI Pro2030 DO/conductivity water quality meter is ideal for any field application. The instrument is rugged and extremely simple to use.

Introducing EXO - A New, State-Of-The-Art Water Monitoring Platform Video

Introducing EXO - A New, State-Of-The-Art Water Monitoring Platform Video

EXO, a state-of-the art water quality monitoring platform, is designed to address the many challenges of collecting accurate field data in the natural environment.

Video: Amiad AMF Filters

Video: Amiad AMF Filters

The Amiad automatic microfiber (AMF) filtration system delivers filtration down to the 2-micron level without the use of disposable cartridges. Polyester microfibers wound tightly around specially designed cores capture suspended solids.
Video: TETRA® Filtration Systems

Video: TETRA® Filtration Systems

Download this video to learn more about Severn Trent Services' award-winning TETRA DeepBed wastewater filtration technology.
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ABOUT DRINKING WATER

In most developed countries, drinking water is regulated to ensure that it meets drinking water quality standards. In the U.S., the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administers these standards under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA)

Drinking water considerations can be divided into three core areas of concern:

  1. Source water for a community’s drinking water supply
  2. Drinking water treatment of source water
  3. Distribution of treated drinking water to consumers

Drinking Water Sources

Source water access is imperative to human survival. Sources may include groundwater from aquifers, surface water from rivers and streams and seawater through a desalination process. Direct or indirect water reuse is also growing in popularity in communities with limited access to sources of traditional surface or groundwater. 

Source water scarcity is a growing concern as populations grow and move to warmer, less aqueous climates; climatic changes take place and industrial and agricultural processes compete with the public’s need for water. The scarcity of water supply and water conservation are major focuses of the American Water Works Association.

Drinking Water Treatment

Drinking Water Treatment involves the removal of pathogens and other contaminants from source water in order to make it safe for humans to consume. Treatment of public drinking water is mandated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the U.S. Common examples of contaminants that need to be treated and removed from water before it is considered potable are microorganisms, disinfectants, disinfection byproducts, inorganic chemicals, organic chemicals and radionuclides.

There are a variety of technologies and processes that can be used for contaminant removal and the removal of pathogens to decontaminate or treat water in a drinking water treatment plant before the clean water is pumped into the water distribution system for consumption.

The first stage in treating drinking water is often called pretreatment and involves screens to remove large debris and objects from the water supply. Aeration can also be used in the pretreatment phase. By mixing air and water, unwanted gases and minerals are removed and the water improves in color, taste and odor.

The second stage in the drinking water treatment process involves coagulation and flocculation. A coagulating agent is added to the water which causes suspended particles to stick together into clumps of material called floc. In sedimentation basins, the heavier floc separates from the water supply and sinks to form sludge, allowing the less turbid water to continue through the process.

During the filtration stage, smaller particles not removed by flocculation are removed from the treated water by running the water through a series of filters. Filter media can include sand, granulated carbon or manufactured membranes. Filtration using reverse osmosis membranes is a critical component of removing salt particles where desalination is being used to treat brackish water or seawater into drinking water.

Following filtration, the water is disinfected to kill or disable any microbes or viruses that could make the consumer sick. The most traditional disinfection method for treating drinking water uses chlorine or chloramines. However, new drinking water disinfection methods are constantly coming to market. Two disinfection methods that have been gaining traction use ozone and ultra-violet (UV) light to disinfect the water supply.

Drinking Water Distribution

Drinking water distribution involves the management of flow of the treated water to the consumer. By some estimates, up to 30% of treated water fails to reach the consumer. This water, often called non-revenue water, escapes from the distribution system through leaks in pipelines and joints, and in extreme cases through water main breaks.

A public water authority manages drinking water distribution through a network of pipes, pumps and valves and monitors that flow using flow, level and pressure measurement sensors and equipment.

Water meters and metering systems such as automatic meter reading (AMR) and advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) allows a water utility to assess a consumer’s water use and charge them for the correct amount of water they have consumed.