DRINKING WATER

Portable Parallel Analysis: Streamlining Distribution System Water Testing

A Water Quality Specialist used the Hach SL1000 Parallel Portable Analyzer (PPA) to test 6 parameters simultaneously – all within about 8 minutes.  Previously, the procedure took 20 minutes just for one parameter.  By cutting down the testing time to 8 minutes, the utility saves about 20,000 gallons of water per site during flushing.  Read the full case study to see how this utility uses Hach PPA to get accurate results in less than half the time.

DRINKING WATER CASE STUDIES AND WHITE PAPERS

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DRINKING WATER APPLICATION NOTES

  • UV Technology Offers Solution For Emerging Water Crisis

    Many are turning to UV as an effective barrier to enable the reuse of wastewater, for indirect reuse, and aquifer recharge.

  • Improved Efficiencies In TOC Wastewater Analysis For Standard Method 5310B And EPA Method 415

    Total Organic Carbon (TOC) measurement is of vital importance to the operation of water treatment due to organic compounds comprising a large group of water pollutants.

  • Application Note: Continuous Monitoring Of Drinking Water Provides Assurance Of Safety A water utility in Ohio wanted to learn more about the variability of water quality parameters such as pH, ORP, turbidity, and chlorine. Previously, most of these parameters had been measured by spot sampling protocols with only a few measurements during a daily period. In order to more accurately assess the water variability, the utility used a YSI 6920DW Drinking Water Multiprobe
  • Water Distribution System Security Monitoring

    Ensuring safe drinking water doesn’t end when the water leaves the water treatment plant. Protecting the safety and security of drinking water from accidental or intentional contamination within the distribution system is becoming increasingly important.

  • Removal of Chloramines with Activated Carbon

    In order to reduce the formation of harmful disinfection byproducts in drinking water, alternative disinfectant use has become increasingly widespread. Monochloramine is a leading alternative disinfectant that offers advantages for municipal water. This tech brief details the removal of monochloramine using activated carbon.

  • Application Note: Simultaneous Determination Of Total Bound Nitrogen (TNb) And Total Organic Carbon (TOC) In Aqueous Samples Total bound nitrogen (TNb) consists of dissolved ammonia, nitrates, nitrites, amines, and other organic nitrogen-containing compounds. TNb measurements represent an alternative to Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen (TKN) analysis for rapid screening of industrial wastewater, drinking water,agricultural run-off, and surface waters. By OI Analytical
  • Application Note: Turbidity Monitoring In Drinking Water Treatment Plants Turbidity, or the relative clarity of a liquid (in this case drinking water), is caused by the presence of microscopic particles such as clay, silt, or other fine undissolved matter
  • Alcoholic Beverage Fusel Alcohol Testing With Static Headspace

    A static headspace method was developed using Teledyne Tekmar automated headspace vial samplers to meet the method requirements of the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau of the US Department of the Treasury (TTB) method SSD: TM:2001 for testing fusel alcohols in alcoholic beverages.

  • Application Note: Ozone Measurement In Potable Water Ozone is a powerful oxidizing agent that can be used to destroy the organic compounds that affect the taste and odor of potable water. Environmental concerns have led to increased use of ozone because, unlike chlorine, it does not form hazardous by-products. By Emerson Process Management, Rosemount Analytical
  • Ion Exchange Resins Reduce Pollution From Refineries

    A single operational oil and gas refinery produces millions of gallons of contaminated wastewater a year, leading to environmental pollution concerns. Ion exchange resins are a metal- and ion-removal solution to help clean this wastewater for plant reuse or safe disposal. This application guide explains how resins can be used to demineralize refinery water in process, boiler, and cooling water applications.

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DRINKING WATER PRODUCTS

WEDECO PRO3MIX Bromate Control System

WEDECO PRO3MIX Bromate Control System

The ozone oxidation of affected drinking water sources with high levels of bromide may lead to bromate formation in the product water. Bromate in drinking water is undesirable as it‘s a suspected human carcinogen. The PRO3MIX bromate control system is an intelligent ozone-based advanced oxidation process (AOP) introduction and reaction system enabling ozone treatment in a compact and intelligent design to mitigate bromate formation even in cases of high level bromide in source water.

Wallace & Tiernan® Analyzers and Controllers

Wallace & Tiernan® Analyzers and Controllers

Wallace & Tiernan MFC analyzer/controller offers a broad combination of drinking water analysis and disinfection/chemical control in a single unit.The MFC analyzer/controller offers an easy, software selectable range of control modes from flow proportional, residual control only, compound loop and set point trim enabling precise control of a chlorinator or metering pump to maintain the desired level of disinfection and water quality.

FLUXUS F704 Ultrasonic Flowmeter

FLUXUS F704 Ultrasonic Flowmeter

With one or two flow channels and versatile electrical inputs and outputs, the FLUXUS F704 can optimally be configured to your application needs, measuring and handling a variety of process parameters.

FPI-X Dual Sensor Electromagnetic Flowmeter

FPI-X Dual Sensor Electromagnetic Flowmeter

Based on the revolutionary FPI Mag®, the FPI-X dual sensor electromagnetic flow meter is designed to deliver a highly accurate measurement in extreme flow conditions unachievable by other flow measurement technologies. The McCrometer FPI-X provides ± 0.5% accuracy in flow with severe swirl, such as cascading or multiple pump arrays.

biottta™ Biotreatment Packaged Plants

biottta™ Biotreatment Packaged Plants

Groundwater is the primary water source for most communities in North America. biottta™ leverages nature to offer an affordable and sustainable solution for wellhead treatment of inorganic and organic contaminants.

N_SIGHT<sup>™</sup> Software Suite

N_SIGHT Software Suite

You may be surrounded by data, but starved for insights. To go beyond basic meter reading and billing, your utility needs tools that provide a deeper understanding of the data you collect — that turn it into meaningful information for a smart water network.

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LATEST INSIGHTS ON DRINKING WATER

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DRINKING WATER VIDEOS

Video: Mayor Bloomberg Announces Installation Of Automated Water Meter Readers

Video: Mayor Bloomberg Announces Installation Of Automated Water Meter Readers

Mayor Bloomberg, Department of Environmental Protection Acting Commissioner Lawitts and Department of Information Technology and Telecommunication Commissioner Cosgrave announced today that citywide installation of automated water meter reading technology has begun.

Low Flow Sampling Using A TROLL® 9500 Water Quality Instrument

The TROLL® 9500 Water Quality Instrument simplifies multiparameter monitoring. The TROLL 9500 is a powerful, portable unit that houses up to nine water quality sensors, internal power, and optional data logging capabilities.

NASA: Megadroughts Projected For American West

NASA scientists used tree rings to understand past droughts and climate models incorporating soil moisture data to estimate future drought risk in the 21st century.

Video: ALTOSONIC III

The ALTOSONIC III is an innovative and economical solution for custody transfer of light oil products. The 3-beam ALTOSONIC III is the outcome of our revolutionary development of liquid multiple-beam ultrasonic flowmeters.
Introducing EXO - A New, State-Of-The-Art Water Monitoring Platform Video

Introducing EXO - A New, State-Of-The-Art Water Monitoring Platform Video

EXO, a state-of-the art water quality monitoring platform, is designed to address the many challenges of collecting accurate field data in the natural environment.

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ABOUT DRINKING WATER

In most developed countries, drinking water is regulated to ensure that it meets drinking water quality standards. In the U.S., the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administers these standards under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA)

Drinking water considerations can be divided into three core areas of concern:

  1. Source water for a community’s drinking water supply
  2. Drinking water treatment of source water
  3. Distribution of treated drinking water to consumers

Drinking Water Sources

Source water access is imperative to human survival. Sources may include groundwater from aquifers, surface water from rivers and streams and seawater through a desalination process. Direct or indirect water reuse is also growing in popularity in communities with limited access to sources of traditional surface or groundwater. 

Source water scarcity is a growing concern as populations grow and move to warmer, less aqueous climates; climatic changes take place and industrial and agricultural processes compete with the public’s need for water. The scarcity of water supply and water conservation are major focuses of the American Water Works Association.

Drinking Water Treatment

Drinking Water Treatment involves the removal of pathogens and other contaminants from source water in order to make it safe for humans to consume. Treatment of public drinking water is mandated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the U.S. Common examples of contaminants that need to be treated and removed from water before it is considered potable are microorganisms, disinfectants, disinfection byproducts, inorganic chemicals, organic chemicals and radionuclides.

There are a variety of technologies and processes that can be used for contaminant removal and the removal of pathogens to decontaminate or treat water in a drinking water treatment plant before the clean water is pumped into the water distribution system for consumption.

The first stage in treating drinking water is often called pretreatment and involves screens to remove large debris and objects from the water supply. Aeration can also be used in the pretreatment phase. By mixing air and water, unwanted gases and minerals are removed and the water improves in color, taste and odor.

The second stage in the drinking water treatment process involves coagulation and flocculation. A coagulating agent is added to the water which causes suspended particles to stick together into clumps of material called floc. In sedimentation basins, the heavier floc separates from the water supply and sinks to form sludge, allowing the less turbid water to continue through the process.

During the filtration stage, smaller particles not removed by flocculation are removed from the treated water by running the water through a series of filters. Filter media can include sand, granulated carbon or manufactured membranes. Filtration using reverse osmosis membranes is a critical component of removing salt particles where desalination is being used to treat brackish water or seawater into drinking water.

Following filtration, the water is disinfected to kill or disable any microbes or viruses that could make the consumer sick. The most traditional disinfection method for treating drinking water uses chlorine or chloramines. However, new drinking water disinfection methods are constantly coming to market. Two disinfection methods that have been gaining traction use ozone and ultra-violet (UV) light to disinfect the water supply.

Drinking Water Distribution

Drinking water distribution involves the management of flow of the treated water to the consumer. By some estimates, up to 30% of treated water fails to reach the consumer. This water, often called non-revenue water, escapes from the distribution system through leaks in pipelines and joints, and in extreme cases through water main breaks.

A public water authority manages drinking water distribution through a network of pipes, pumps and valves and monitors that flow using flow, level and pressure measurement sensors and equipment.

Water meters and metering systems such as automatic meter reading (AMR) and advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) allows a water utility to assess a consumer’s water use and charge them for the correct amount of water they have consumed.