DRINKING WATER

Systems Work In Series To Increase Filter Run Times, Reduce Water Use, And Improve Finished Water Quality

The city of Florence, Colorado Water Treatment Plant (WTP), located 75 miles south of Denver, uses blended surface water taken from the city’s southernmost water reservoir.

DRINKING WATER CASE STUDIES AND WHITE PAPERS

  • Case Study: Water Supplier Ensures DBP Compliance With UV254 Organic Monitoring
    Case Study: Water Supplier Ensures DBP Compliance With UV254 Organic Monitoring Mohawk Valley Water Authority (MVWA) is a progressive supplier of potable water. With source water from the Adirondack Mountains, MVWA works to improve on nature and provide superior water quality, always striving to meet or exceed drinking water standards. Like many other surface water sources, MVWA’s water supply is rich with natural organic matter (NOM). Unfortunately, growing research has demonstrated that NOM in water when combined with chlorine leads to the formation of potentially harmful disinfection by-products.
  • Protecting Our Water – Keep Chemicals In The Tank
    Protecting Our Water – Keep Chemicals In The Tank

    Leaking or overfilled tanks can cause environmental problems, contaminate drinking water, and cost a company millions of dollars. Proper instrumentation, monitoring and control can prevent these problems. By Bill Sholette, Level Products Business Manager, and Ricardo Chavez, Solutions Business Manager, Endress+Hauser

  • Submersible Pumps Solve Oxygen Depletion Problems
    Submersible Pumps Solve Oxygen Depletion Problems

    At the Marston Water Treatment Plant, Denver Water shared the seasonal oxygen depletion concerns confronted by many utilities that use surface impoundments as their raw water source. Especially in autumn, customers complained that the water had an undesirable taste, odor, and color. Learn how the utility overcame this problem by installing a 35-horsepower submersible pump that moves five times more oxygen than a conventional aeration system.

  • 4-Log Virus Inactivation - Abington, Pennsylvania (Case Study)
    4-Log Virus Inactivation - Abington, Pennsylvania (Case Study)

    The Hall Road Well Station — located in Abington, Pennsylvania — is designed to extract and treat 1.5 million gallons per day (MGD) of water from the Piedmont and Blue Ridge crystalline-rock aquifers. It is part of a network of groundwater extraction wells owned and operated by Aqua-America Pennsylvania (Aqua PA). Aqua PA determined that UV technology was the best approach for meeting the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection regulations for 4-log virus treatment of groundwater. This case study will show you why they chose the TrojanUVSwift™SC.

  • White Paper: Point-Of-Entry/Point-Of-Use Filtration Combination Earns LEED Design Credit The U.S. Green Building Council has issued a CIR (Credit Interpretations and Rulings) awarding an Innovation in Design credit under its LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) program for a specific two-stage water filtration system to eliminate the need for bottled water in a 1,200-unit luxury apartment building.
  • Color Reduction From RO Concentrate
    Color Reduction From RO Concentrate

    The City of Palm Coast, FL was experiencing elevated color in the concentrate stream being directed to the lime softening facility to recover as drinking water. In an effort to meet secondary color standards at the lime plant, this water quality issue limited the volume of the concentrate able to be recovered.

  • Water Utilities Slow To Embrace Smart Meter Technologies Water utilities appear to be under water when it comes to conservation efforts and adopting new technologies to help customers monitor water usage. Although water is viewed as a precious resource around the globe, little is being done to save water in North America.
  • No Wizardry In ‘Emerald City’s’ Dramatic Water Quality Improvement
    No Wizardry In ‘Emerald City’s’ Dramatic Water Quality Improvement

    With the installation of a new disinfection system featuring on-site sodium hypochlorite generation, a water treatment plant improved water quality and significantly reduced total trihalomethanes and haloacetic acid levels. By Ali Giti

  • Performance Of A Conventional Surface Water Plant Using Mixed-Oxidants For Microflocculation And Final Disinfection
    Performance Of A Conventional Surface Water Plant Using Mixed-Oxidants For Microflocculation And Final Disinfection

    The surface water source is from snow-melt and summer thunderstorm run-off from the mountains. This water is detained in McClure Reservoir (7876 ft elevation) and Nichols Reservoir (7483 ft elevation) upstream from the CRWTP, a conventional plant built in 1974 with a design capacity of 8 MGD. Because the City has limited surface water rights, and due to decreased demand, the treatment plant usually shuts down for 60 to 90 days during winter. The reservoirs thaw in spring and turn over in autumn, and during the summer rainy season, raw water turbidities may exceed 5 NTU. By MIOX Corporation

  • Mueller Systems: Chillicothe Municipal Utilities Improves Customer Service, Operational Efficiencies With The Mi.Net™ System
    Mueller Systems: Chillicothe Municipal Utilities Improves Customer Service, Operational Efficiencies With The Mi.Net™ System

    CMU was in the process of replacing more than 4,000 outdated water and electric meters when it determined that the project also presented an ideal opportunity to implement a systemwide advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) network.

More Drinking Water Case Studies and White Papers

DRINKING WATER APPLICATION NOTES

More Drinking Water Application Notes

DRINKING WATER PRODUCTS

Leopold FilterWorx® Automatic Control System by Xylem

Leopold FilterWorx® Automatic Control System by Xylem

The FilterWorx® Automatic Control System by Leopold is a complete filter control package consisting of all instrumentation and control equipment for the automatic monitoring and control of municipal water filtration systems.

Vaccuperm Chlorine Disinfection Systems

Vaccuperm Chlorine Disinfection Systems

Measure & control your chlorine gas dosing with absolute dependability – our full vacuum systems ensure process reliability.
MC4-150 Dry Calcium Hypochlorite Feeding System

MC4-150 Dry Calcium Hypochlorite Feeding System

The MC4-150 dry calcium hypochlorite feeding system prepares and automatically delivers a consistently accurate dose of liquid available chlorine for disinfection applications.

MagnaPak™ DOC Removal Systems

MagnaPak™ DOC Removal Systems

The MagnaPak™ System provides a simple, cost-effective solution for meeting EPA disinfection by-product standards by utilizing the MIEX® ion exchange resin to remove dissolved organic carbon – a precursor to DBP formation – from the raw water supply

WEDECO BX Series Closed Vessel Ultraviolet Reactors by Xylem

WEDECO BX Series Closed Vessel Ultraviolet Reactors by Xylem

The WEDECO BX Series Closed Vessel UV Reactors are used for drinking water applications.

Signet 2250 Hydrostatic Level Sensor

Signet 2250 Hydrostatic Level Sensor

The Signet 2250 Hydrostatic Level Sensor for level and depth control has a one-piece injection molded PVDF body and ceramic diaphragm for superior compatibility in corrosive liquids
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LATEST INSIGHTS ON DRINKING WATER

  • Securing Water for Food: Investing in High-Potential Innovations
    Securing Water for Food: Investing in High-Potential Innovations

    Securing Water for Food aims to source and accelerate game-changing solutions that will increase water availability and promote efficient use of water in agriculture.

  • Ultrasonic vs. 'Old School' Water Meters
    Ultrasonic vs. 'Old School' Water Meters

    In this Q&A, Water Online posed questions to Greg Land of Master Meter on the value of ultrasonic flow meters versus previously installed technologies.

  • 10 Must-See Membrane Technologies
    10 Must-See Membrane Technologies

    A collection of innovative membrane technologies found at the AWWA/AMTA Membrane Technology Conference & Exposition

  • Partnership For Smart Water Solutions
    Partnership For Smart Water Solutions

    Water Online Radio sat down with Silver Springs Networks and Master Meter to discuss the companies’ partnership to incorporate Master Meter’s proven advanced water metering products with Silver Spring’s existing multi-application network, creating a comprehensive solution that allows utilities to easily track and bill their customers through a single reliable, secure network.

  • Assessing Pipe Bursts And Non-Revenue Water
    Assessing Pipe Bursts And Non-Revenue Water

    How much water will a pipe burst cost you? Here’s a method for determining losses.

  • What The Water Sector Could Learn From The Electric Side
    What The Water Sector Could Learn From The Electric Side

    Each year, the nation wastes an estimated two trillion gallons, or about 14 to 18 percent, of its treated water through leaks alone. That’s a lot of water – enough to fill over three million Olympic-size swimming pools.

More Drinking Water Features

DRINKING WATER VIDEOS

Mueller Systems 420 Remote Connect/Disconnect Meter (RDM) Video

Mueller Systems 420 Remote Connect/Disconnect Meter (RDM) Video

See how 420 Remote Connect/Disconnect Meter (RDM) from Mueller Systems can optimize AMI and AMR systems to help utilities improve the operational efficiency of their water systems.

The House On Wade Avenue

The House On Wade Avenue

In Raleigh, N.C., there's a house... or what looks like a house. What's hidden inside is more important than most people realize.

Subcommittee Hearing: Cyanotoxins In Drinking Water

On Wednesday, November 19, 2014, at 10:15 a.m. in 2322 Rayburn House Office Building, the Subcommittee on Environment and the Economy will hold a hearing entitled “Cyanotoxins in Drinking Water."

Matt Damon's Mission To End World Poverty

In 2007 he was named People magazine's Sexiest Man Alive, but these days, Matt Damon is getting noticed for something far less sexy. During a trip to Africa in 2006, Damon made it his mission to help people in developing countries have access to safe water and sanitation. He talks to Katie Couric in "World 3.0".

Video: Monitoring Water Consumption

Video: Monitoring Water Consumption

KROHNE's Joe Incontri discusses monitoring water consumption and the importance of accurate and reliable meters. Water savings means green savings.
More Drinking Water Videos

ABOUT DRINKING WATER

In most developed countries, drinking water is regulated to ensure that it meets drinking water quality standards. In the U.S., the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administers these standards under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA)

Drinking water considerations can be divided into three core areas of concern:

  1. Source water for a community’s drinking water supply
  2. Drinking water treatment of source water
  3. Distribution of treated drinking water to consumers

Drinking Water Sources

Source water access is imperative to human survival. Sources may include groundwater from aquifers, surface water from rivers and streams and seawater through a desalination process. Direct or indirect water reuse is also growing in popularity in communities with limited access to sources of traditional surface or groundwater. 

Source water scarcity is a growing concern as populations grow and move to warmer, less aqueous climates; climatic changes take place and industrial and agricultural processes compete with the public’s need for water. The scarcity of water supply and water conservation are major focuses of the American Water Works Association.

Drinking Water Treatment

Drinking Water Treatment involves the removal of pathogens and other contaminants from source water in order to make it safe for humans to consume. Treatment of public drinking water is mandated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the U.S. Common examples of contaminants that need to be treated and removed from water before it is considered potable are microorganisms, disinfectants, disinfection byproducts, inorganic chemicals, organic chemicals and radionuclides.

There are a variety of technologies and processes that can be used for contaminant removal and the removal of pathogens to decontaminate or treat water in a drinking water treatment plant before the clean water is pumped into the water distribution system for consumption.

The first stage in treating drinking water is often called pretreatment and involves screens to remove large debris and objects from the water supply. Aeration can also be used in the pretreatment phase. By mixing air and water, unwanted gases and minerals are removed and the water improves in color, taste and odor.

The second stage in the drinking water treatment process involves coagulation and flocculation. A coagulating agent is added to the water which causes suspended particles to stick together into clumps of material called floc. In sedimentation basins, the heavier floc separates from the water supply and sinks to form sludge, allowing the less turbid water to continue through the process.

During the filtration stage, smaller particles not removed by flocculation are removed from the treated water by running the water through a series of filters. Filter media can include sand, granulated carbon or manufactured membranes. Filtration using reverse osmosis membranes is a critical component of removing salt particles where desalination is being used to treat brackish water or seawater into drinking water.

Following filtration, the water is disinfected to kill or disable any microbes or viruses that could make the consumer sick. The most traditional disinfection method for treating drinking water uses chlorine or chloramines. However, new drinking water disinfection methods are constantly coming to market. Two disinfection methods that have been gaining traction use ozone and ultra-violet (UV) light to disinfect the water supply.

Drinking Water Distribution

Drinking water distribution involves the management of flow of the treated water to the consumer. By some estimates, up to 30% of treated water fails to reach the consumer. This water, often called non-revenue water, escapes from the distribution system through leaks in pipelines and joints, and in extreme cases through water main breaks.

A public water authority manages drinking water distribution through a network of pipes, pumps and valves and monitors that flow using flow, level and pressure measurement sensors and equipment.

Water meters and metering systems such as automatic meter reading (AMR) and advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) allows a water utility to assess a consumer’s water use and charge them for the correct amount of water they have consumed.