DRINKING WATER CASE STUDIES AND WHITE PAPERS

  • Assessing Key Unconventional Shale Wastewater Trends And Opportunities
    Assessing Key Unconventional Shale Wastewater Trends And Opportunities

    The shale-gas boom could make water the most important commodity product of the 21st century.

  • Three Steps For Reducing Total Cost Of Ownership (TCO) In Pumping Systems
    Three Steps For Reducing Total Cost Of Ownership (TCO) In Pumping Systems

    Energy costs have become an increasing contributor to pumping systems Total Cost of Ownership (TCO). In fact, energy cost represents 40% of the TCO of a typical pump. It is possible to reduce the electrical consumption by at least 30% utilizing Variable Speed Drives while decreasing maintenance costs associated with the mechanical driven system. This paper explains how to reduce TCO with a limited investment focused on three key areas: energy efficiency management, asset management, and energy cost management.

  • Full Scale Installation: Village Of Bartlett, Illinois

    Located 35 miles northwest of Chicago, current population approximately 36,000. Average radium levels approximately 9 pCi/L. No other treatment, only the addition of chlorine and polyphosphate.

  • Protecting Our Water – Keep Chemicals In The Tank
    Protecting Our Water – Keep Chemicals In The Tank

    Leaking or overfilled tanks can cause environmental problems, contaminate drinking water, and cost a company millions of dollars. Proper instrumentation, monitoring and control can prevent these problems. By Bill Sholette, Level Products Business Manager, and Ricardo Chavez, Solutions Business Manager, Endress+Hauser

  • ORP Based Measurement Of Oxidizing Disinfectants In Aqueous Solutions
    ORP Based Measurement Of Oxidizing Disinfectants In Aqueous Solutions

    Oxidizing antimicrobials, such as chlorine, are common disinfectants used to treat water. Test strips, DPD kits, and colorimeters are currently the most popular methods for determining the relative disinfecting power of oxidizing antimicrobial agents in these applications. By Myron L Company

  • Drinking Water Disinfection - Coquitlam Water Treatment Plant, British Columbia (Case Study)
    Drinking Water Disinfection - Coquitlam Water Treatment Plant, British Columbia (Case Study)

    In 2005, in response to changes to the Canadian Drinking Water Quality guidelines, the Greater Vancouver Water District Board approved a proposal to upgrade the Coquitlam WTP with UV disinfection technology to act as the primary means of disinfection.

  • White Paper: The Leopold® Clari-DAF™ System For Membrane Pretreatment The idea that membranes could be used for solids removal and concentration in potable water treatment schemes has been known for hundreds of years. It has only been in the past 50 years or so that reverse osmosis membranes for treating brackish waters or sea water have been considered a cost-effective viable alternative. More recently, the membrane suppliers have produced low-pressure membranes that are applied in current treatment process schemes to enhance the water quality effluent required to meet additional regulatory guidelines
  • Eliminate CIP And Cut Wastewater Disposal In Half With CCD
    Eliminate CIP And Cut Wastewater Disposal In Half With CCD

    A high water recovery rate is essential for this well-known soy protein manufacturer.

  • A New Way To Desalinate — Government Tested, Real-World Approved
    A New Way To Desalinate — Government Tested, Real-World Approved

    Developed by the Department of Defense, capacitive deionization (CDI) removes salt from water, while conventional methods remove water from salt. By Patrick Curran, CEO and founder, Atlantis Technologies

  • Using Granular Activated Carbon To Meet DBP Regulations
    Using Granular Activated Carbon To Meet DBP Regulations

    The Roche Harbor Water Treatment Plant is located on the northwest side of San Juan Island in San Juan County, Washington state. Although a significant part of the land in the county is privately owned, the watersheds there provide a public benefit for both residents and visitors.  San Juan Island’s economy is tourist-driven; the island was voted #2 on the New York Times list of “41 Places to go in 2011.” Its marina has been a top boating destination for more than fifty years. Incorporated in 1886, the community has seen slow but steady population growth in recent decades. Roche Harbor Water System Inc. has been in operation since 1968 when PVC piping replaced the island’s existing wooden pipe system.

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DRINKING WATER APPLICATION NOTES

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DRINKING WATER PRODUCTS

SALINO® Pressure Center

SALINO® Pressure Center

In small to medium-sized desalination systems the SALINO® Pressure Center proves that greatness has nothing to do with size. The 4-in-1 technology combines all relevant components needed for pressure boosting and energy recovery in one RO system.

MicroChem®2 Analyzer, Transmitter & Controller

MicroChem®2 Analyzer, Transmitter & Controller

MicroChem 2 is a new generation family of transmitters and controllers, suitable for all the needs of analysis and process control.

Sensus Logic Meter Data Management

Sensus Logic Meter Data Management

Sensus Logic™ Provides Intelligence, Improved Customer Service and Flexibility

OptiFiber<sup>®</sup> PES-14 Microfiber Cloth

OptiFiber® PES-14 Microfiber Cloth

OptiFiber PES-14® Microfiber cloth filtration media is engineered to remove suspended solids, turbidity and fine particles up to 50% better than other filters or microscreens. Microfiber cloth media is proven to reduce total phosphorus to 0.1 mg/l or less.

Aquamove Mobile Water Treatment Solutions

Aquamove Mobile Water Treatment Solutions

Veolia Water Technologies offers Aquamove™ mobile water treatment services and capabilities. Aquamove can be used for water utilities requiring temporary or supplemental treatment equipment and industries using purified water for their production lines or utilities.

OPUS&reg; Technology - Optimized Pretreatment and Unique Separation Technology

OPUS® Technology - Optimized Pretreatment and Unique Separation Technology

OPUS technology combines a proprietary high rate chemical softening process, MULTIFLO, with filtration, ion exchange, and reverse osmosis operated at an elevated pH in single-pass or double-pass mode to generate high effluent water quality suitable for discharge, recycle or reuse.
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LATEST INSIGHTS ON DRINKING WATER

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DRINKING WATER VIDEOS

Video: YSI Professional Plus Multiparameter Meter

Video: YSI Professional Plus Multiparameter Meter

This video gives an overview of the features and benefits of the YSI Professional Plus, or Pro Plus, handheld multiparameter water quality instrument.

Low Flow Sampling Using A TROLL® 9500 Water Quality Instrument

The TROLL® 9500 Water Quality Instrument simplifies multiparameter monitoring. The TROLL 9500 is a powerful, portable unit that houses up to nine water quality sensors, internal power, and optional data logging capabilities.

The House On Wade Avenue

The House On Wade Avenue

In Raleigh, N.C., there's a house... or what looks like a house. What's hidden inside is more important than most people realize.

Video: UAT™ Membrane Filtration Systems

Video: UAT™ Membrane Filtration Systems

Using high quality components, the skid-mounted UAT systems are engineered to effectively produce treated water, free of particulate matter or contaminants
Video: Mayor Bloomberg Announces Installation Of Automated Water Meter Readers

Video: Mayor Bloomberg Announces Installation Of Automated Water Meter Readers

Mayor Bloomberg, Department of Environmental Protection Acting Commissioner Lawitts and Department of Information Technology and Telecommunication Commissioner Cosgrave announced today that citywide installation of automated water meter reading technology has begun.
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ABOUT DRINKING WATER

In most developed countries, drinking water is regulated to ensure that it meets drinking water quality standards. In the U.S., the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administers these standards under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA)

Drinking water considerations can be divided into three core areas of concern:

  1. Source water for a community’s drinking water supply
  2. Drinking water treatment of source water
  3. Distribution of treated drinking water to consumers

Drinking Water Sources

Source water access is imperative to human survival. Sources may include groundwater from aquifers, surface water from rivers and streams and seawater through a desalination process. Direct or indirect water reuse is also growing in popularity in communities with limited access to sources of traditional surface or groundwater. 

Source water scarcity is a growing concern as populations grow and move to warmer, less aqueous climates; climatic changes take place and industrial and agricultural processes compete with the public’s need for water. The scarcity of water supply and water conservation are major focuses of the American Water Works Association.

Drinking Water Treatment

Drinking Water Treatment involves the removal of pathogens and other contaminants from source water in order to make it safe for humans to consume. Treatment of public drinking water is mandated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the U.S. Common examples of contaminants that need to be treated and removed from water before it is considered potable are microorganisms, disinfectants, disinfection byproducts, inorganic chemicals, organic chemicals and radionuclides.

There are a variety of technologies and processes that can be used for contaminant removal and the removal of pathogens to decontaminate or treat water in a drinking water treatment plant before the clean water is pumped into the water distribution system for consumption.

The first stage in treating drinking water is often called pretreatment and involves screens to remove large debris and objects from the water supply. Aeration can also be used in the pretreatment phase. By mixing air and water, unwanted gases and minerals are removed and the water improves in color, taste and odor.

The second stage in the drinking water treatment process involves coagulation and flocculation. A coagulating agent is added to the water which causes suspended particles to stick together into clumps of material called floc. In sedimentation basins, the heavier floc separates from the water supply and sinks to form sludge, allowing the less turbid water to continue through the process.

During the filtration stage, smaller particles not removed by flocculation are removed from the treated water by running the water through a series of filters. Filter media can include sand, granulated carbon or manufactured membranes. Filtration using reverse osmosis membranes is a critical component of removing salt particles where desalination is being used to treat brackish water or seawater into drinking water.

Following filtration, the water is disinfected to kill or disable any microbes or viruses that could make the consumer sick. The most traditional disinfection method for treating drinking water uses chlorine or chloramines. However, new drinking water disinfection methods are constantly coming to market. Two disinfection methods that have been gaining traction use ozone and ultra-violet (UV) light to disinfect the water supply.

Drinking Water Distribution

Drinking water distribution involves the management of flow of the treated water to the consumer. By some estimates, up to 30% of treated water fails to reach the consumer. This water, often called non-revenue water, escapes from the distribution system through leaks in pipelines and joints, and in extreme cases through water main breaks.

A public water authority manages drinking water distribution through a network of pipes, pumps and valves and monitors that flow using flow, level and pressure measurement sensors and equipment.

Water meters and metering systems such as automatic meter reading (AMR) and advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) allows a water utility to assess a consumer’s water use and charge them for the correct amount of water they have consumed.