Water Industry Features, Insights, & Analysis

  1. Wastewater Reuse And Recycling Today
    3/1/2019

    Over the last several years the wastewater reuse segment of the water industry has experienced both rapid growth and tremendous change. Global demand for increased water supplies fuels the development of alternative water sources, including reclaimed wastewater.

  2. New AMI Capabilities Help Satisfy Utility Aims
    6/22/2019

    Finding new ways to capture and utilize data is important for utilities looking to improve operating efficiency and customer service. This interview with Frank Brooks and Dave Rubin from Aclara — a smart-infrastructure solutions partner for water, gas, and/or electric utilities — outlines ways to do both within a common infrastructure.

  3. Find More Insight In Your Deluge Of Water Data
    4/24/2019

    With the proliferation of new sensors and Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) initiatives now feeding SCADA systems, water industry managers lament how they are drowning in a sea of data yet starving for insights that really matter. With concepts like data democratization starting to bear fruit, advanced analytical capabilities are creating new opportunities for water insights without requiring a degree in computer science.

  4. Calibrating Success: Improved Tools To Maintain Flowmeter Accuracy
    7/10/2019

    Water utilities with highly successful monitoring programs tend to share a common trait: they have a well-defined plan for calibration that emphasizes frequency and tracking. However, when done properly, this process is time-consuming and often leads to unnecessary labor and downtime. The good news is that advanced metering technology is available for plants to get a better handle on the instrument’s performance with significantly less effort.

  5. United Utilities, The UK's Largest Water Utility Optimizes Incident Management And Regulatory Reporting
    11/5/2018

    United Utilities is responsible for providing the water and sewerage services for over 3 million customers in Northwest England, and a population of 7 million, making it the largest listed utility in the United Kingdom (U.K.).

  6. Pushing Water Reuse To The Extremes
    3/9/2019

    Large-scale water-reuse treatment plants have had sustainable impact in populated areas where the volume of water to be treated and reused in a concentrated area makes them practical. Today, the flat-sheet membrane aerated biofilm reactor (MABR) technology that is delivering high-quality wastewater treatment to remote locations is poised to realize the promise of sustainable water reuse in those same locations.

  7. Flint Returns To Machine Learning Solution For Lead Line Replacement
    2/11/2019

    The fallout from Flint, Michigan’s lead-contaminated drinking water has been far-flung and long-lasting.

  8. If A Pipe Leaks In A Forest, Does It Make A Sound? (Part II)
    9/6/2018

    If A Pipe Leaks In A Forest, Does It Make A Sound? (Part I) addressed condition assessment and leak detection from the perspective of surprises that can arise when “hidden” problems are revealed by acoustic technology. This article introduces several more eye-opening experiences with permanent and mobile acoustic leak detection equipment, plus examples of just how expensive undetected leaks can become when they turn into full-blown water main breaks.

  9. Using Advanced Tools To Stem The Lost Revenue Tide
    5/29/2019

    From the largest metropolitan utilities to the smallest water systems, leaks are a problem everywhere. Because it’s difficult to raise consumer prices to offset the losses, non-revenue water has a direct impact on the bottom line of municipal water systems. However, utility managers now have an opportunity to reverse the problem with advanced flow meter technology that combines multiple measurements.

  10. DC Water’s Unconventional Approach To Utility Management
    1/15/2018

    Over the past 10 years, DC Water has become the harbinger of the modern water utility. It’s often unconventional approach to tackling age-old problems usually elicits one of two responses from other utility professionals. The first response is one of resignation — if only I had the budget that size permits, I’d be able to do similar things. And the second is one of awe — there’s no way I have the amount of gumption to convince regulators or customers that I have a better way.