Water Industry Features, Insights, & Analysis

  1. Smart Meters Educate Consumers On Water Usage
    9/12/2018

    Can you imagine calling the electric company to demand a rebate because you had just received your bill and realized that over the past month, you inadvertently left all your lights on? As ludicrous as this scenario seems, it’s exactly the type of call water utilities receive from their customers.

  2. How To Leverage Water Data To 'Make Your Case'
    5/24/2019

    Efficiently managing potable water treatment and distribution or wastewater collection and treatment involves many moving components, not the least of which are cost implications. If only there was a way to quantify and analyze those factors to leverage them for better decision-making. There are, and they reach far beyond tactical treatment plant adjustments, all the way up to strategic decisions as well.

  3. It Runs Through A River: 1.7 Miles Of AMERICAN Products Help Deliver Water In North Alabama
    4/26/2019

    Six million gallons of water per day (MGD) sounds like a lot of water, and it is, but it wasn’t enough to meet Limestone County’s projected demands for drinking water. Around 1,000 customers were being added each year, and a number of inquiries had been made about increased industrial development.

  4. Remote Monitoring For Water Quality And Public Health
    5/10/2018

    New technology helps utilities meet the challenges of maintaining a safe and adequate public water supply.

  5. Knowledge Retention: Stay Up To Date As Workers Come And Go
    3/22/2019

    Understaffing, upcoming retirements, and finding qualified replacements seem to be recurring themes in the water industry. Perhaps the answers are as much about the tools we use as the people using them. Here is how a new approach to utility data management can capture the knowledge of retiring workers, share the insight across all disciplines, and shore up the skills and interests of the next generation.

  6. Membrane Aerated Biofilm Reactor Technology Validated For Title 22 Compliance
    2/13/2019

    Title 22 of California’s Water Recycling Criteria is among the strictest water treatment standards for water recycling and reuse in the United States. Fluence’s MABR demonstration plant was installed at the Codiga Resource Recovery Center (CR2C) in Stanford, California, in January 2018 for the purpose of third-party evaluation. The testing parameters included criteria to evaluate reliable enhanced nutrient removal in the form of Total Nitrogen, which is increasingly important across the United States and difficult and costly to achieve through conventional wastewater treatment.

  7. Gulf Of Mexico’s Hypoxic Zone Larger Than Ever
    2/15/2018

    Last year, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) recorded the largest hypoxic zone in the Gulf of Mexico since monitoring began 32 years ago. Hypoxic waters, often referred to as dead zones, have dissolved oxygen concentrations of less than 2-3 ppm. They are caused by eutrophication or excess nutrients that promote algal growth in water bodies. As algae decompose, they consume oxygen creating dead zones.

  8. Smarter Spending: Using Data Analysis To Drive Infrastructure Investment Decisions
    5/8/2018

    Data analysis around pipe condition, inflow & infiltration (I&I), and overflows can build a case for the approval of infrastructure funding in budget planning.

  9. Water Metering Supports Sustainable Water Management Solutions
    5/22/2019

    The term “carbon footprint” has been on everyone’s lips since the start of the climate change discussion. Very few industries can claim that they play no part in impacting the carbon footprint — either for good or bad. This is also true for the water and wastewater industry that will have to take a closer look at increasing the efficiency of their facilities to reduce their carbon footprint.

  10. The Secret Life Of Water At Evoqua Water Technologies
    5/22/2019

    Evoqua Water Technologies indirectly affects the water used by hundreds of millions of people around the world. It provides water purification and management solutions—filtrations, separation, disinfection, technologies, and service—used by 70 percent of US municipalities, 90 percent of the largest US chemical companies, 85 percent of pharmaceutical companies, the world’s largest food and beverage companies, and 60 percent of US Navy vessels.