Drinking Water Disinfection Podcasts

  1. Drumming Up Chemical Injection
    10/24/2017

    The operating ranges for chemical injection need to be large because of the variability of flow in many treatment operations. As Bill McDowell, Vice President of Operations with Blue White Industries explains in this Water Talk interview, “You might be down to as low as 5 or 10 milliliters a minute and then one hour later; you might need to pump 15 gallons a minute out of the same pump and through the same sensor.”

  2. TrojanUV + Water Reuse (Audio)
    12/4/2011

    Jennifer Muller, municipal marketing director for TrojanUV, sat down with Water Online Radio for this live interview from the show floor at WEFTEC 2011 in Los Angeles. Muller talked about Trojan’s ultraviolet (UV) disinfection technology and how it lends itself to the important issues of water reuse and sustainability.

  3. LA Story: Advanced Treatment, Reuse Saves Scarce Water Resources
    9/24/2015

    Officials in Los Angeles have grown tired of importing water, which is an expensive, unsustainable response to the region's persistent drought. The smarter solution, they concluded, is to reuse local resources through advanced purification and aquifer recharge. But how do you ensure safety and efficiency before committing to a treatment technology? A unique piloting tool from Xylem’s Wedeco brand offered the city clear answers.

  4. Water Quality Comes Under The Consumer Microscope
    7/12/2017

    Water quality is getting a lot more scrutiny these days. And that’s a good thing says Russ Swerdfeger, Global Director of Memcor Product Management with Evoqua. Alongside his colleague Daryl Weatherup, Director of Marketing with Evoqua, Swerdfeger recently discussed the future of drinking water and the key issues and concerns facing the water industry right now with Water Talk.

  5. On-Site Generation: A Green Technology
    6/23/2015

    John Deogracias, a Commercial Leader with the Parkson Corporation, sat down with Water Online Radio at ACE15 to discuss the MaximOS product line, which uses a patented, award-winning technology of on-site generation.

  6. On Site Hydrogen Peroxide Generation for Advanced Oxidation Process
    7/6/2016

    Vitamins, steroids and hormones are all emerging as contaminants being detected in drinking water supplies. As Jon McClean, Chief Technology Officer with Neptune Benson explains in this Water Online Radio interview, advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) add hydrogen peroxide in front of UV treatment to eradicate contamination.

  7. Fostering Innovation From Within
    7/3/2017

    Every water treatment challenge is a little different. Many companies have a variety of technologies that can be applied to meet the demands of their water utility customers. One such company would be SUEZ. Water Talk recently sat down with Adriano Vieira, Director of R&D with the SUEZ IDEAS Center, to learn more about the unique approach the Company’s North American arm is taking to innovation.

  8. Upcoming Tech: Alternatives To Coal-Based Activated Carbon, Magnetite Ballasted, And More
    8/20/2014

    In this Water Online interview, Paul Rice of Evoqua talks about the company’s variety of technologies which span across a wide range of water treatment solutions. One highlight is Evoqua’s AquaCarb CX, a coconut shell-based activated carbon that offers an alternative to coal-based activated carbon for removing disinfection byproducts, tastes, and odors.

  9. Polymer Activation And Onsite Hypochlorite Generation
    11/3/2016

    Polymer activation through proper hydration of the polymer particle is critical in water clarification or sludge dewatering applications. According to Jeff Rhodes, Vice President of Commercial Development for UGSI Solutions, “the key is to have a high energy zone at the moment of initial welding, when the polymer and the water come together.”

  10. Microbial Contamination Monitoring For Water Distribution Systems
    7/5/2017

    Back in 2014, Louisiana’s Department of Health and Hospitals wrote an executive order for municipalities to boost their chlorine residuals as high as possible to burn off all biofilm and stop the outbreak of brain-eating amoeba (Naegleria fowleri) that had been detected as the cause of death in a number of individuals.